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Home :: Archive :: 1998 :: April ::
Re: 15 M. Ham.; Oath; Vocabulary
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0320  Tuesday, 7 April 1998.

[1]     From:   Harry Rusche <
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        Date:   Monday, 6 Apr 1998 14:32:11 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0303  TV Offerings This Month

[2]     From:   Mary Jane Miller <
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        Date:   Monday, 6 Apr 1998 15:00:59 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0279  Re: Hamlet's Oath

[3]     From:   Jonathan Hope <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 07 Apr 1998 11:31:49 +0000 (GMT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0307  Old-fashioned Vocabulary Drills


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Harry Rusche <
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 >
Date:           Monday, 6 Apr 1998 14:32:11 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 9.0303  TV Offerings This Month
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0303  TV Offerings This Month

If the Bravo Channel is showing Tom Stoppard's _Fifteen-Minute Hamlet_,
then it is perhaps available commercially.  Does anyone know if this is
so?  We unfortunately do not have the Bravo Channel on my local cable
service.  So as not to clog up the list, please respond personally to
me.

Many thanks.

Harry Rusche
Emory University

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Mary Jane Miller <
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 >
Date:           Monday, 6 Apr 1998 15:00:59 -0500
Subject: 9.0279  Re: Hamlet's Oath
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0279  Re: Hamlet's Oath

Shock can impel people to joke. Inappropriate laughter is  a common
experience, particularly in a situation which calls for solemnity.
Handling his shock by joking is another possibility and  I think the
more likely. He has to bleed off that manic energy somehow and the
interruptions of the oath do not allow him to do it with the final
gesture he intends. Also in some of his other responses to shock (
leaping in to Ophelia's grave, he also slips into the grotesque.

Yet that odd sequence can end with Hamlet's lines delivered as a  gentle
admonition /promise " rest, rest perturbed spirit" which can bring the
whole scene down to more manageable and familiar proportions.  I
remember someone ( who?) reaching down to pat the stage on that line in
a soothing gesture.

In any case I miss  that sequence  when it is omitted.

Mary Jane Miller

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jonathan Hope <
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 >
Date:           Tuesday, 07 Apr 1998 11:31:49 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: 9.0307  Old-fashioned Vocabulary Drills
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0307  Old-fashioned Vocabulary Drills

We do a bit of that.  What's the fuss?

Jonathan Hope
Middlesex University
 

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