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Home :: Archive :: 1998 :: April ::
Re: AYL Quotation
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0329  Thursday, 9 April 1998.

[1]     From:   John Jowett <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 8 Apr 1998 16:41:15 GMT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0325  Q: AYL Quotation

[2]     From:   John V Robinson <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 8 Apr 1998 16:13:40 EDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0325  Q: AYL Quotation


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Jowett <
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Date:           Wednesday, 8 Apr 1998 16:41:15 GMT
Subject: 9.0325  Q: AYL Quotation
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0325  Q: AYL Quotation

Scott Crozier asked about Celia's 'So you may put a man in your belly'.
This seems to be (apart from anything else) a variation on the proverb
'I wish it were in your belly', meaning 'I wish you'd shut up about
it'.  When Falstaff makes a long mocking speech about Bardolph's face,
Bardolph similarly responds ''Sblood, I would my face were in your
belly' (1 Henry IV, 3.3.48).  Falstaff's responds in turn, 'So should I
be sure to be heart-burned', which suggests that the alteration of a
recognised idiom produced a comically incongruous phrase.

Rosalind similarly jokes by taking Celia literally (Is he of God's
making...).  But she has already compared the man (that is, word of whom
he is) to wine that she wishes to drink (playing on 'drink' in the
figurative sense 'understand'), and so to put in her belly.  The entire
exchange is based on knowing confusion between (a) the spoken word 'man'
and its referent, and (b) the literal and the metaphorical.  The sexual
innuendo, with 'belly' as 'womb', is also there, as Scott suggests.

John Jowett

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John V Robinson <
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Date:           Wednesday, 8 Apr 1998 16:13:40 EDT
Subject: 9.0325  Q: AYL Quotation
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0325  Q: AYL Quotation

I'm not sure this reference is to procreation per se.  I think it
relates to
the fact that Rosalind is disguised as a man, therefore the reference is
to the fact that men draw  (false) courage from a bottle of ale.
 

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