Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 1998 :: April ::
Re: Beatrice and Don Pedro; Jessica
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0353  Thursday, 16 April 1998.

[1]     From:   Chris Stroffolino <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Wednesday, 15 Apr 1998 11:09:28 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0338  Re: Beatrice and Don Pedro

[2]     From:   Chris Stroffolino <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Wednesday, 15 Apr 1998 12:07:44 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0347  Re: Jessica


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Chris Stroffolino <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Wednesday, 15 Apr 1998 11:09:28 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 9.0338  Re: Beatrice and Don Pedro
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0338  Re: Beatrice and Don Pedro

In response to Dave Evett's claim that Beatrice rejects Don Pedro
because she of course really wants Benedick....  Well, I don't think
that's entirely self-evident at this point in the play. I think she
definitely expresses interest in Benedick, but when Benedick lacks the
stomach to make the first move, and runs off because he can't abide his
lady tongue etc, I think Beatrice is definitely considering other
options....  Now, it may come as a surprise to some, but I think what's
happening in her exchange with Don Pedro is that she has given up on
Benedick and is expressing interest in DP's bastard brother, DON
JOHN.... It may not be extremely serious interest, and she doesn't know
that DJ is a "villain" yet, but she does claim to want a man halfway
between Benedick and Don John earlier, comments that Benedick is to be
commended more for his villainy than his wit and her initially remark to
Don Pedro ambiguously can refer to either him or Don John. Curious what
others might think...chris stroffolino

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Chris Stroffolino <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Wednesday, 15 Apr 1998 12:07:44 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 9.0347  Re: Jessica
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0347  Re: Jessica

John Drakakis claims that "there is no controversy" about Jessica
becoming a Christian in the play's "dominant discourse" (and Dave Evett
goes further and says it's not even in the subdominant discourse of
Gobbo etc.). I am curious about where we draw the line between the
play's "dominant discourse" and the "subversive counter-thesis".
Jessica, of course, presents a complex problem of ethical judgment, yet
the role of LORENZO probably needs to be considered more fully in order
to give us a sense of Jessica. By looking at the problem as a binary
(Jessica-vs. Shylock), we ignore Jessica's disillusionment (although a
comic one) in Lorenzo, which becomes increasingly evident when she's in
Belmont. I believe this is in the dominant discourse of the play (and
yes I agree with Ms. Rackin's reading of the significance of the ring to
draw such connections between the subplot and the Portia plot), whether
it's Gobbo's jabs at Lorenzo's THEFT of Jessica, and "raising the price
of HOGS!", or Jessica's increased self-knowledge that Lorenzo is not the
"savior" she had once thought him. Chris Stroffolino
 

Other Messages In This Thread

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.