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Home :: Archive :: 1998 :: April ::
Re: Beatrice and Don Pedro
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0356  Friday, 17 April 1998.

[1]     From:   Melissa D. Aaron <
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        Date:   Thursday, 16 Apr 1998 10:00:14 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0353  Re: Beatrice and Don Pedro

[2]     From:   David M Richman <
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        Date:   Thursday, 16 Apr 1998 12:22:42 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0353  Re: Beatrice and Don Pedro

[3]     From:   Christine Mack Gordon <
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        Date:   Thursday, 16 Apr 1998 12:57:54 CST6CDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0353 Re: Beatrice and Don Pedro

[4]     From:   David Evett <
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        Date:   Thursday, 16 Apr 1998 14:53:15 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0353  Re: Beatrice and Don Pedro; Jessica

[5]     From:   Michael Friedman <
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        Date:   Thursday, 16 Apr 1998 16:29:22 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0353  Re: Beatrice and Don Pedro


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Melissa D. Aaron <
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Date:           Thursday, 16 Apr 1998 10:00:14 -0500
Subject: 9.0353  Re: Beatrice and Don Pedro
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0353  Re: Beatrice and Don Pedro

>In response to Dave Evett's claim that Beatrice rejects Don Pedro
>because she of course really wants Benedick....  Well, I don't think
>that's entirely self-evident at this point in the play. I think she
>definitely expresses interest in Benedick, but when Benedick lacks the
>stomach to make the first move, and runs off because he can't abide his
>lady tongue etc, I think Beatrice is definitely considering other
>options....

Hmm.  I always thought that there had been some sort of abortive
romantic history between Benedick and Beatrice before.  I can't see what
else she could mean by  this exchange with Don Pedro-

DP:  Come, lady, come, you have lost the heart of Signior Benedick.
Beatrice:  Indeed, my lord, he lent it me awhile, and I gave him use for
it, a double heart for his single one. Marry, once before he won it of
me with false dice, therefore your Grace may well say I have lost it.

As far as why she rejects Don Pedro, I wouldn't say that she really
wants Benedick.  I think she doesn't want anyone who isn't Benedick, and
she knows better than to want him, which is slightly different.

Melissa Aaron
University of Wisconsin-Madison

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David M Richman <
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Date:           Thursday, 16 Apr 1998 12:22:42 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 9.0353  Re: Beatrice and Don Pedro
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0353  Re: Beatrice and Don Pedro

I offer an extended analysis of the theatrical effect of the
Beatrice-Don Pedro scene in Chapter II of my *Laughter, Pain, and
Wonder*.  I argue that Beatrice's prose rhythms suggest that she is
growing quite agitated-just as Benedick's prose rhythms in his parallel
scene with Don Pedro suggest that he is growing similarly agitated.  The
Beatrice-Don Pedro scene was exceptionally well-played by
Thompson-Washington in the movie.  Don Pedro's masterminding of the
benevolent deception connects interestingly to these two scenes.  David
Richman

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Christine Mack Gordon <
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Date:           Thursday, 16 Apr 1998 12:57:54 CST6CDT
Subject: 9.0353 Re: Beatrice and Don Pedro
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0353 Re: Beatrice and Don Pedro

I really like Chris Stroffolino's idea that Beatrice might be attracted
to Don John. Clearly he's the only new addition to the coterie of
available males, and she has taken note (!) of him, as her dialogue at
the beginning of this scene indicates. Has anyone ever seen a production
that plays with this idea at all?

On another topic, I saw the Guthrie Theater production of _Much Ado_
earlier this week at a preview (it opened last night) and was very
disappointed (as were my 16 and 19-year-old children, who have become
quite the Shakepseare experts, despite their youth). The pacing was off,
the energy was off, there seemed to be no chemistry between either pair
of lovers, and the cast seemed bent on "explaining" everything to an
audience for which they evidently had little respect. The play was set
in the mid-to-late 19th century, and the costumes reflected that period.
The set on the Guthrie's thrust stage combined elements that became
variously a chapel (where the play began with a speech by the Friar that
was lifted from Richmond's final speech in _Richard III_), garden,
entrance to the Governor's home, etc.  The best Shakespeare in
Minneapolis is unfortunately _not_ being produced at its flagship
theater.

Chris Gordon

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Evett <
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Date:           Thursday, 16 Apr 1998 14:53:15 -0400
Subject: 9.0353  Re: Beatrice and Don Pedro; Jessica
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0353  Re: Beatrice and Don Pedro; Jessica

I would like for Chris Stroffolino to show me the textual basis for his
assertion that "Jessica's disillusionment (although a comic one) in
Lorenzo. . . becomes increasingly evident when she's in Belmont."  And
for his suggestion that Beatrice finds Don John attractive.

Dave Evett

[5]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Michael Friedman <
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Date:           Thursday, 16 Apr 1998 16:29:22 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 9.0353  Re: Beatrice and Don Pedro
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0353  Re: Beatrice and Don Pedro

To Chris Stroffolino,

At the beginning of Act II, Beatrice says of Don John, "How tartly that
gentleman looks!  I never can see him but I am heart-burned an hour
after." (2.1.3-4).  How would that comment fit into your argument that
she is interested in him as a possible lover?

Michael Friedman
University of Scranton
 

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