1998

Re: Temple Editions

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0387  Thursday, 23 April 1998.

[1]     From:   Dale Lyles <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 22 Apr 1998 22:23:21 EDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0385  Qs: Temple Editions

[2]     From:   Michael A. Morrison <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 23 Apr 1998 02:57:15 EDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0385  Q: Temple Editions


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Dale Lyles <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 22 Apr 1998 22:23:21 EDT
Subject: 9.0385  Qs: Temple Editions
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0385  Qs: Temple Editions

When we did *Heartbreak House*, we assumed that Ellie picked up the
"Shakespeare" for something to read while waiting for someone to welcome
her to the Captain's home.  What else would you find to peruse in
Hesione's over-intellectualized, over-refined environment but
Shakespeare?

But perhaps the Temple edition does have some significance?

And aren't we all glad Shakespeare didn't write, on the whole, stage
directions?

Dale Lyles
Newnan Community Theatre Company

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Michael A. Morrison <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 23 Apr 1998 02:57:15 EDT
Subject: 9.0385  Q: Temple Editions
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0385  Q: Temple Editions

The Temple editions were widely popular, portable editions of the
individual plays. They were originally published in 1895 by J. M. Dent
(London) and E. P. Dutton (New York) and were issued in many subsequent
editions. By 1916 some of the plays were in their sixteenth printing.
The most recent "New Temple" play I have is from 1957. If someone wanted
to take a copy of Othello off on a country-house weekend in the
mid-teens, the pocket- or purse-size Temple edition would have been just
the thing. All best, Michael A. Morrison

LION: "tribes"

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0386  Thursday, 23 April 1998.

From:           Michael Best <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 22 Apr 1998 10:34:55 -0700
Subject:        Tribes

Hardy's useful posting on the value of the Early Modern English
Dictionaries Database in tracing meanings for the use of "tribe"
reminded me of the increasing use I make of the Chadwyck-Healey LION
(LIterature On Line) databases. Unfortunately LION is expensive to
subscribe to, unlike the EMEDD, which is freely available on line.

For those of you whose institions do not subscribe to LION, here are the
results of some searches on the word "tribe" or "tribes". LION can be
divided into different categories-Medieval, Tudor, Moralities, and so
on.

What I found interesting in these results is that "tribe" seems to have
been used exclusively in the context of Jews up until the early years of
the seventeenth century, when it began to be applied metaphorically (see
the examples in the entries from Fletcher and _King Lear_). I've not
included all quotations, for reasons of space (apologies for the length
of the posting).

MEDIEVAL (39 hits, 9 works)

1. Anonymous (Medieval): Moses and the law (1974) -- 1
2. Anonymous (Medieval): The pageant of Dauid (1920) -- 1
3. Anonymous (Medieval): The pageant of Elias (1920) -- 3
4. Anonymous (Medieval): The pageant of Ioseph (1920) -- 1
5. Anonymous (Medieval): The pageant of Iosue (1920) -- 9
6. Anonymous (Medieval): The pageant of Moyses (1920) -- 14
7. Anonymous (Medieval): The pageant of Salomon (1920) -- 2
8. Anonymous (Medieval): The pageant of Samson (1920) -- 1
9. Anonymous (Medieval): The pageant of Saul (1920) -- 7

TUDOR (none)

UNIVERSITY PLAYS TO 1642 (none)

MORALITIES (1 hit)

1. Anonymous (Moralities): Godly Queene Hester (1904) -- 1

     ...and Iacob had a lyke name, Of whom the twelue  tribes
     descended be, which euer dyd maintaine hospitallyte.

ELIZABETHAN (11 hits, 2 works)

Marlowe, Christopher: The Jew of Malta (1633) -- 2
     ...Iewes are wicked, as all Christians are: But say the
     Tribe that I descended of Were all in generall cast...

     ...or it shall goe hard. I am not of the  Tribe of Levy ,
     I, That can so soone forget...

Peele, George: The love of King David and fair Bethsabe (1599) -- 9
     ...wicked man to reigne, Ouer his loued people and his
     Tribes: The child shall surely die, that erst was borne,...

     ...as it is promised, Subdue the daughters of the Gentils
     Tribes, All this must be performd by Dauids hand....

     ...And suffered Rabba with the Philistime To raile vpon the
      tribe of Beniamin. Hannon. Harke man, as sure as Saul...

     ...this diademe. Ioab. Beauteous and bright is he among the
      Tribes, As when the sunne attind in glist'ring robe,
     Comes...

     ...hast thou determined So hard a part against the righteous
      Tribes To follow and pursue the banished, When as to...

     ...his youth, Why liueth Absalon, and is not honoured Of
     Tribes and Elders, and the mightiest ones, That round
     about...

     ...addresse me as I may, To loue the men and  Tribes of
     Israel. [Stage direction] [Stage direction] ...

     ...graue: A graue of shame, and skorne of all the  Tribes,
     Now then to saue your honours from the dust,...

     ...conquest pierced on his speare, And ioy from all the
     Tribes of Israel. Dauid. Thou man of bloud, thou sepulchre...

JACOBEAN AND CAROLINE (141 hits)
  -- Limit search to plays published before 1620 (27 hits, 16 works)

1. Daborne, Robert: A Christian turn'd Turke (1612) -- 4
2. Dekker, Thomas / Middleton, Thomas: The roaring girle (1611) -- 1

     ...what Girle, this Roaring Girle should be. (For of that
     Tribe are many.)

3. Dekker, Thomas / Webster, John: West-ward hoe (1607) -- 1
4. Fletcher, John / Beaumont, Francis: The scornful ladie (1616) --  4

     ...of your discouery. Sir they are in tribes
     like Iewes: the Kitchen and the Dayrie
     make one  tribe, and haue their faction and
     their fornication within themselues;...

     ...I am not for your dyet: marry in your owne
     Tribe Iew , and get a Broker. ...

     ...put thee into blood. VVould all his damb'd
     tribe were as tender hearted. I beseech you let this...

5. Jonson, Ben: Catiline his conspiracy (1616) -- 3
6. Jonson, Ben: Every man out of his humor (1616) -- 1
7. Jonson, Ben: Love restored (1616) -- 1
8. Jonson, Ben: Mercurie vindicated from the alchemists (1616) -- 1
    9. Jonson, Ben: Poetaster (1616) -- 2
10. Marston, John (1576-1634): What you will (1607) -- 1
11. Marston, John (1576-1634) / Barksted, William / Mackin, Lewis:
    The insatiate countesse (1613) -- 1
12. Middleton, Thomas: The Inner-Temple masque (1619) -- 1
13. Middleton, Thomas / Rowley, William: A faire quarrell (1617) -- 1
14. S. S.: The honest lawyer (1616) -- 1
15. Shakespeare, William: King Lear (1623) -- 1

       ...Goe to th'creating a whole  tribe of Fops Got 'tweene a
sleepe,
       and wake?

16. Shakespeare, William: The merchant of Venice (1623) -- 3

Michael Best
Department of English, University of Victoria
Victoria B.C. V8W 3W1, Canada. (250) 598-9575
<This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
<http://www.engl.uvic.ca/Faculty/MBHomePage>

Coordinating Editor, Internet Shakespeare Editions
<http://web.uvic.ca/shakespeare>

Macbeth Web Site; New Globe Video

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0384  Wednesday, 22 April 1998.

[1]     From:   Ed Friedlander <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
D       ate:    Tuesday, 21 Apr 1998 08:41:19 CST
        Subj:   Macbeth

[2]     From:   Michael Bennett  <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 20 Apr 1998 13:52:15 -0400
        Subj:   New Globe Video


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ed Friedlander <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 21 Apr 1998 08:41:19 CST
Subject:        Macbeth

My new site

http://worldmall.com/erf/macbeth.htm

grew out of a question about exactly what is "grease that's sweaten from
the murderer's gibbet".

I thought that students should have an easy place to find out the
historical background for the play as well.  I decided to put everything
I could find in one place.

If anyone has Holinshed's sources, I'd be most grateful for a
snailmailed photocopy.

1750 Independence Blvd, KC MO 64106

I'm grateful for this list, which I've enjoyed going on three years
how.  Health and friendship.

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Michael Bennett  <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 20 Apr 1998 13:52:15 -0400
Subject:        New Globe Video

[This arrived in my University mailbox clearly as a promotional;
nevertheless, I thought some might be interest.  HMC]

********************
Dear Shakespeare Professional:

ANNOUNCING A NEW VIDEO  - SHAKESPEARE'S GLOBE THEATRE RESTORED

MUCH ADO ABOUT SOMETHING!

This new video, Shakespeare's Globe Theatre Restored, documents eighteen
months of planning, rehearsal, location work, and post-production by the
Shakespeare Program of the University of California at Berkeley,
culminating in a historically significant production of Much Ado About
Nothing. This was an unforgettable experience for the UCB actors from
the Shakespeare Program to stage the first recorded Elizabethan
production of Shakespeare on the newly rebuilt Globe stage,

Almost 4 centuries after Shakespeare's original Globe Theatre commenced
performances in 1599, Queen Elizabeth II officially opened the
reconstructed Elizabethan Theatre for its first full season in June
1997.

Inspired by Actor Sam Wanamaker, the restored Globe Theatre, built on
the Bankside of the river Thames near its original site in Southwark,
London, has no modern parallel.

To celebrate Shakespeare's work and to recreate performances with the
original setting and effects for which Shakespeare wrote his greatest
plays, the rebuilt and fully operational Globe provides a venue for
teaching and studying his plays in the ultimate authentic performance
setting. The Restored Globe Theatre illuminates Shakespeare's original
open air acoustics and stage-craft.

According to Hugh M. Richmond, Educational Director of the Shakespeare
Globe Centre, U.S.A. and Professor of English at the University of
California at Berkeley,

"This video showcases some of the ways in which performance on the
original configuration of the Shakespearean stage diverges from modern
practice.  Above all, the broad stage, pillars and accessibility of the
audience require a dynamic choreography and outgoing style providing a
fresh model for modern theatre."

A MUST For Serious Students Of Shakespeare And The Dramatic Arts!

ORDER NOW  - ONLY $39.95  + Shipping and Handling. We accept credit
cards, institutional purchase orders and personal checks. Supplied with
teachers guide in VHS NTSC (USA TV) format. PAL format available for
Europe and Australia for $12 US additional.

For more information or to order, please contact Dawson Mays at:

TMW Media Group
2321 Abbot Kinney Blvd., Venice, CA 90291
Call: 310-577-8581 or Fax 310-574-0886
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Web: http://www.tmwmedia.com

Qs: Temple Editions; Tudor Government Jobs

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0385  Wednesday, 22 April 1998.

[1]     From:   Cary Mazer <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 21 Apr 1998 13:46:50
        Subj:   query

[2]     From:   Rebecca C Totaro <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 21 Apr 1998 18:30:08 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: Government appointments


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Cary Mazer <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 21 Apr 1998 13:46:50
Subject:        query

Can someone tell me the significance of the "Temple" single-play
editions of Shakespeare-or, more specifically, whether it is at all
significant that a middle-class, cultured, well-educated, slightly
romantic young lady in 1916 would travel to a country-house weekend with
a copy of the Temple Shakespeare Othello (as opposed to some other
edition)?

(Shaw fans will be able to spot the reference to Heartbreak House, which
I am currently dramaturging at People's Light & Theatre Company, in
Malvern, PA.)

Thanks.
Cary

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Rebecca C Totaro <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 21 Apr 1998 18:30:08 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Re: Government appointments

Can anyone help me determine how men in Tudor England were appointed to
the positions in London government such as Sheriff, Under-Sheriffs, and
"Commissioner of Sewers"?  Also, how might I learn more about the duties
that came with those jobs?

Thank you.

In Tribute to Maragaret Demorest

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0383  Wednesday, 22 April 1998.

From:           Peter Nockolds <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 21 Apr 1998 12:09:36 +0100 (BST)
Subject:        In Tribute to Maragaret Demorest

In Tribute to Margaret Demorest

I met Margaret Demorest through 'Shaksper' and was privileged to
correspond with her for a  few weeks before her passing.  I believe that
her concept of a calendar in Shakespeare's sonnets will come to be seen
as a significant contribution to Shakespeare studies.

Kent Hieatt's identification of a calendar in the heart of Spenser's
"Amoretti", corresponding to the 47 days from Ash Wednesday to Easter
Sunday, has won widespread acceptance.  Margaret suggested that there
are correspondences between events in years 1501-1609 and Shakespeare's
sonnets 1 -     109.

For sceptics I would suggest that Shakespeare had a precedent.  At least
one editor of Sidney, Katherine Duncan Jones, (The Oxford Authors)
remarks on the odd-placing of sonnet 75 in "Astrophil and Stella".
This, as KDJ and everyone else agree, refers to the Treaty of PicQuigny
in 1475 (not 74 as implied in her notes) whereby Edward IV received an
annual pension of 75,000 crowns from the French King Louis. The 75 in
1475 and 75,000 would explain the position of this sonnet.  Others have
linked the reference to 'Sir Phip' in 83 to Sidney's knighthood, which
he received in 1583.  So far as I know those who identified these
historical correspondences weren't trying to justify a calendar theory.
I do not suppose that there have been many similar claims of such
historical correspondences, therefore the date/number correlations in
these instances appear significant. Calendrical considerations seem to
account for the positions of these two sonnets.

Given such a clear precedent we may approach Margaret's claims for a
calendar in Shakespeare's sonnets.  She claims that the calendar
relates, in substantial part, to the Tudor succession.  I give just one
example, sonnet 37:

As a decrepit father takes delight,
To see his active childe do deeds of youth,
So I, made lame by Fortunes dearest spight

In 1537 Henry VIII rejoiced at the birth of a legitimate male heir.  In
the same year he suffered from an acute leg infection (reference
available). To Margaret's observations I would add the words in this
sonnet

'do crowned sit' and 'ten times happy'

The OED traces the Biblical use of 'time/s' for 'year/s' (Rev 12, 14),
which appears in the Authorised version, back to Wyclif's translation of
1382.  Ten years later in 1547 Edward was crowned King. The
juxtaposition of 'ten times' and 'happy' is a leitmotific recurrence
from the second and third quatrains of sonnet 6, where these are
specifically and repeatedly linked with the breeding of an heir.
'Intitled in their parts' preceding 'do crowned sit' refers to Edward's
legitimacy. Additionally such commentators as Kerrigan and Booth link
the appearance of 'substance' and 'shadow' in 37 with 53, the latter
corresponding to 1553 the year of Edward's death.  The dead boy-king may
be one inspiration for the substance/shadow theme in the sonnets.

This is just one example from many, to which I'll add only by observing
that Kerrigan (Penguin Edition) notes that the 'Rose' motif in sonnet 1
reaches a fulfillment in 109, the latter corresponding to 1609, the date
of publication.  The Rose is of course a Tudor symbol.

The concept of a calendar in the sonnets may not sit well with the
traditional majority view that the sonnets were largely composed in the
1590's and that the Quarto was unauthorised.  It is however compatible
with the views expressed by Katherine Duncan Jones in the recent Arden
edition of 'Shakespeare's Sonnets' that most of these belong to the
first decade of the 17th century and that the Quarto was authorised.

Shakespeare delights in multiple meanings so the existence of a calendar
in the sonnets need not contradict an autobiographical reading: it may
simply be taken simply as an extra layer of meaning.

I am preparing a longer review of Margaret's work, which I will forward
to anyone interested.

Peter Nockolds

'Name in the Window', Margaret Demorest, 1996, is currently listed at
www.amazon.com, price $18.95.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Search

Make a Gift to SHAKSPER

Consider making a gift to support SHAKSPER.