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Home :: Archive :: 1998 :: May ::
Re: Anagram; Jenning's Hamlet
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0414  Monday, 4 May 1998.

[1]     From:   John Owen <
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        Date:   Friday, 1 May 1998 15:18:09 EDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0410  Re: Amazing Anagram

[2]     From:   Michael Ullyot <
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        Date:   Friday, 1 May 1998 16:52:44 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0411  Alex Jenning's Hamlet


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Owen <
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 >
Date:           Friday, 1 May 1998 15:18:09 EDT
Subject: 9.0410  Re: Amazing Anagram
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0410  Re: Amazing Anagram

>>I don't get it!

> I do, and it is pretty amazing... Take all the letters in the first
 >sentence, and rearrange them. One of the possible sentences you can
come
 >up with is the second.

I'm from Missouri... show me!

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Michael Ullyot <
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Date:           Friday, 1 May 1998 16:52:44 -0400
Subject: 9.0411  Alex Jenning's Hamlet
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0411  Alex Jenning's Hamlet

John McWilliams asks for observations on Alex Jenning's Hamlet in the
RSC production.  As I ordered my tickets for the RST in Stratford I was
warned that it was to be played in modern dress, as if this was a
detraction. On the contrary, with Alex Jenning's performance it was the
best I had ever seen.  The opening sequence with the scratchy home
movies of the Hamlets in happier times certainly stressed the
egregiousness of Claudius' fratricide, and (as McWilliams suggests) the
centrality of the trap door- particularly in the initial Rosencrantz &
Guildenstern scene, with their invasion of Hamlet's private, attic-like
chambers-was a production element I'm still mulling over. Any more
thoughts about this trap door, besides the valences of the gravesite?

Michael Ullyot
 

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