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Home :: Archive :: 1998 :: May ::
Re: the Onlie Begetter; Jenning's Hamlet
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0428  Wednesday, 6 May 1998.

[1]     From:   David Evett <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 05 May 1998 12:31:42 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0420  Re: the Onlie Begetter

[2]     From:   Lisa Hodgkinson <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 5 May 1998 19:54:28 +0100
        Subj:   Re: Jenning's Hamlet


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Evett <
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Date:           Tuesday, 05 May 1998 12:31:42 -0400
Subject: 9.0420  Re: the Onlie Begetter
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0420  Re: the Onlie Begetter

William Williams thinks it "unlikely" that early modern writers would
write their initials in lower case.  My paleographic experience is
limited, but I do know very well one set of 15 MSS of which 13 are in
the same hand, a relatively clear secretary heavily influenced by
italic, by a writer presumptively of Shakespeare's generation.  This
writer frequently but not invariably uses miniscule forms at the
beginning of sentences and proper names, and in a least one instance
does so in a set of initials.

Paleographically,
Dave Evett

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Lisa Hodgkinson <
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Date:           Tuesday, 5 May 1998 19:54:28 +0100
Subject:        Re: Jenning's Hamlet

I have always thought that the mark of a good production is that it
makes you feel as if you are seeing the play for the first time. I came
out of Jenning's Hamlet with all my preconceptions about the play (and I
had a few - thanks to studying it several times) scattered to the
proverbial winds.  The RSC really should not apologise for putting on
radical new interpretations of plays, they do it so little. I am a fan
of Alex Jennings anyway, but one of the reasons why this Hamlet was so
good was the fact that the poetry was spoken so well, so resonantly, and
that the sense and emotion was so clear. This is something that one can
no longer automatically expect from the RSC and so any production where
it does happen is special. One of the other examples of this kind of
quality was found in their latest Dream, a truly stunning production
which achieved a level of 'magic' that is rarely seen. Oh, and Alex
Jennings was in that too... Is there a connection?
 

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