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Home :: Archive :: 1998 :: May ::
Qs: Bottom; Autolycus; Bedford Texts
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0454  Monday, 11 May 1998.

[1]     From:   Ed Friedlander <
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        Date:   Friday, 8 May 1998 11:36:51 CST
        Subj:   Bottom

[2]     From:   Clifford Stetner <
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        Date:   Friday, 8 May 1998 19:45:24 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Autolycus

[3]     From:   Nicholas R Moschovakis <
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        Date:   Friday, 8 May 1998 18:19:52 -0600
        Subj:   Bedford Texts & Contexts


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ed Friedlander <
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Date:           Friday, 8 May 1998 11:36:51 CST
Subject:        Bottom

I have been told that Bottom satirizes Puritans and that Puritanism was
especially popular among weavers.

I'll probably have to decide for myself about the first.  Is there any
evidence that Shakespeare's audience would have recognized weavers as
puritans?

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Clifford Stetner <
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Date:           Friday, 8 May 1998 19:45:24 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Autolycus

Can someone direct me to a source for the etymology of the name
"Autolycus" (Winter's Tale)?  I know it is the name of the son of Hermes
and ancestor of Odysseus.  I am interested in the possible association
with "lycos" -  wolf and "auto" - self (?).

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Nicholas R Moschovakis <
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Date:           Friday, 8 May 1998 18:19:52 -0600
Subject:        Bedford Texts & Contexts

An appeal for advice from the academics out there:

I'm looking over the Bedford paperback *Shrew* (ed. Dolan) in the "Texts
& Contexts" series for next semester, and am wondering whether any on
the list have had success (or not) assigning this text to college
students, specifically in lower-division courses.

It's so heavy with social history that I'm somewhat apprehensive about
using it with first-years. Is it possible to give vocabulary, verse, and
theatrical matters the amount of attention which beginning readers of
Shakespeare are likely to require, while at the same time juggling
non-Shakespearean 16th-century documents and discussing the finer points
of the Homilies and state authority in relation to cultural practice? (I
would have about three weeks to teach the play, at the end of which the
Alabama Shakespeare Festival is performing the play on campus.)

Bedford apparently has a *Macbeth* in the same series; comments on this
text (which I haven't seen - they forgot to send me one) would be
welcome as well.

Thanks.
 

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