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Home :: Archive :: 1998 :: May ::
Re: Pronunciation
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0477  Tuesday, 19 May 1998.

[1]     From:   David Lindley <
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        Date:   Monday, 18 May 1998 20:07:26 GMT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0473  Re: Pronunciation

[2]     From:   Andrew Walker White <
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        Date:   Monday, 18 May 1998 17:48:40 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0473  Re: Pronunciation

[3]     From:   Wes Folkerth <
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        Date:   Monday, 18 May 1998 21:32:17 -0500
        Subj:   Pronouncing at the New Globe

[4]     From:   Richard J. Kennedy <
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        Date:   Monday, 18 May 1998 20:30:18 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0473  Re: Pronunciation

[5]     From:   David Schalkwyk <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 19 May 1998 09:29:19 SAST-2
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0473  Re: Pronunciation


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Lindley <
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Date:           Monday, 18 May 1998 20:07:26 GMT
Subject: 9.0473  Re: Pronunciation
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0473  Re: Pronunciation

I wonder why Jonathan Hope thinks efforts to re-present original
pronunciation would be 'Disneyland'?  Many people working on early music
performance consider the effort to find some pronunciation closer at
least to the period of composition is analogous to trying to play on
instruments built with the materials and specifications of the relevant
time.  I would be the first to concede that on many occasions these
efforts are not very solidly founded - but the effort at least to try
does, on occasion, prove revelatory.

David Lindley
School of English
University of Leeds

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Andrew Walker White <
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Date:           Monday, 18 May 1998 17:48:40 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 9.0473  Re: Pronunciation
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0473  Re: Pronunciation

A colleague of mine here in Washington, D.C., once worked with Barton
informally, and shocked him by using his native Kentuckian dialect
during a scene from R II.  the heretofore unrhymable suddenly rhymed,
and the sight of Barton scrambling for his text was worth the risk of
using an inappropriate accent for the royals involved...

Cheers,
Andrew Walker White
Arlington, VA

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Wes Folkerth <
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Date:           Monday, 18 May 1998 21:32:17 -0500
Subject:        Pronouncing at the New Globe

I for one enthusiastically support Andrew Gurr's attempts at an
archaeology of the lived experience of playgoing in Shakespeare's time.
Granted, I haven't had the opportunity to visit the New Globe-yet.  So
maybe I've got the aura of the place all wrong.  But I see nothing wrong
with imaginative, informed reconstruction.  That's everything the best
history can aspire to -- just ask the nearest poststructuralist.

Those who critique the project invariably include a (by now stale) jab
at its touristy side.  They never seem to mention that at least one of
the more important visual documents scholars have for the original Globe
came from the observations of a tourist, Johannes DeWitt with his sketch
of the Swan.

Wes Folkerth

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[4]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard J. Kennedy <
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Date:           Monday, 18 May 1998 20:30:18 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 9.0473  Re: Pronunciation
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0473  Re: Pronunciation

About pronunciation, how would you say that Wriothesley is pronounced?
Henry, that is, friend of Shakespeare.

[5]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Schalkwyk <
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Date:           Tuesday, 19 May 1998 09:29:19 SAST-2
Subject: 9.0473  Re: Pronunciation
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0473  Re: Pronunciation

I'm intrigued by the fact that the New Globe continues to be haunted by
Disney.  Last July I saw a production of _Henry V_ one night and was
riding Big Thunder Mountain the next.  The close juxtaposition of the
experiences set me thinking about the approach that each takes to
historical authenticity.  I decided that Disney was both more honest and
more philosophically astute . . . "Authentic" pronunciation seems to me
to be completely in the spirit of authenticity as the Globe understands
it, but _not_ as Disney does.

David Schalkwyk
English Department
University of Cape Town
 

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