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Home :: Archive :: 1998 :: May ::
Qs: Related to Cavendish; Coleridge on Hamlet
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0500  Monday, 25 May 1998.

[1]     From:   James Fitzmaurice <
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        Date:   Friday, 22 May 1998 09:17:20 -0700
        Subj:   Questions Related to Cavendish

[2]     From:   Judy Kennedy <
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        Date:   Saturday, 23 May 1998 10:09:09 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Coleridge on Hamlet: Question


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           James Fitzmaurice <
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Date:           Friday, 22 May 1998 09:17:20 -0700
Subject:        Questions Related to Cavendish

I would appreciate any help from list members on a set of questions
arising from my work on an edition of The Variety, a play written by
William Cavendish, Duke of Newcastle, and produced at the Blackfriars
around 1640.  I have tried the OED and a great many of the usual
reference tools in each case.

Jim Fitzmaurice

1.  A silly character named Jeer 2 makes the following joke: "Ha, ha,
ha; and how many french tennistalls have you in your flanke now? ha, ha,
ha." Is "tennistalls" a misprint for "tennisballs" or is there another
joke?

2.  Another character reports as gossip: "And I do heare the Camells
decay at Tiballs."  Was Tiball's a zoo?

3.  A simple remark: "For linnen breeches, though some think them
cleanly, in my opinion they imitate a Dutch Stove too much."  Were Dutch
stoves prone to collect soot?

4.  What are the "eight severall weapons" of fencing?

5.  Who was "Lord Loftie [who] danced the Galliard"? DNB does not get me
too far here.  Adam Loftus, 1568 - 1643?

6.  Who was Duke de Memorency?  not in DNB, OED, Enclcl. Brit. 11th ed.,
or current Encycl. Brit. index.

7.  I have been unable to trace the following which appear to be
allusions to song lyrics or song titles "Adam Bell," "Clim oth' Clough,"
"We be three," and  "Good Mr. William of Cloudesly."  I have spent a
good deal of time with various books including the Roxburghe Ballads,
William Chappell's Old English Popular Music, Musical Ayres and
Dialogues, by Wilson and Colman, Britain's Bowere of Delight, and
Day's  English Song Books.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Judy Kennedy <
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Date:           Saturday, 23 May 1998 10:09:09 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Coleridge on Hamlet: Question

In 1885 Grace Latham, arguing that sounds of words become vehicles of
expression,  wrote:

'Coleridge recognizes this when he says that the speech of Hamlet:--

        "Thrift, thrift, Horatio! the funeral baked meats
         Did coldly furnish forth the marriage tables"

-- shows by its hissing sound the scorn of which his mind is full;'

I have not been able to locate this dictum of Coleridge's.  I've looked
in Raysor, the 1836 _Literary Remains_, Woodring's Princeton edition of
_Table Talk_, the Furness Variorum, (but come to think of it I haven't
yet checked the 1821), and various modern editions.  However, I am
perfectly capable of not seeing something that's right under my nose (I
do it all the time trying to find books in the stacks of libraries); I'd
be very grateful to anyone who can correct my cross-eyed myopia in this
instance.

Judy Kennedy

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