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Home :: Archive :: 1998 :: May ::
Re: Cavendish Qs
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0502  Tuesday, 26 May 1998.

[1]     From:   Richard Dutton <
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        Date:   Monday, 25 May 1998 16:11:00 +0100
        Subj:   RE: SHK 9.0500  Qs: Related to Cavendish; Coleridge on Hamlet

[2]     From:   Stanley Wells <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 26 May 1998 16:11:51 +0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0500  Qs: Related to Cavendish; Coleridge on Hamlet


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard Dutton <
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Date:           Monday, 25 May 1998 16:11:00 +0100
Subject: 9.0500  Qs: Related to Cavendish; Coleridge on Hamlet
Comment:        RE: SHK 9.0500  Qs: Related to Cavendish; Coleridge on Hamlet

A quick response to the second of Jim Fitzmaurice's questions: 'Tiballs'
looks as though it may well be a reference to Theobalds (pronounced
Tibalds), originally the seat of Sir Robert Cecil/Earl of Salisbury but
given by him to James I (in, memory suggests, 1607) in exchange for what
became Hatfield House. James was apparently very fond of it because of
its convenience for hunting. I have no idea what became of it
thereafter, but it could have housed a royal menagerie (as the Tower of
London had done in the past).

Richard Dutton

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Stanley Wells <
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Date:           Tuesday, 26 May 1998 16:11:51 +0000
Subject: 9.0500  Qs: Related to Cavendish; Coleridge on Hamlet
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0500  Qs: Related to Cavendish; Coleridge on Hamlet

> 2.  Another character reports as gossip: "And I do heare the Camells
> decay at Tiballs."  Was Tiball's a zoo?

I suspect it's Theobalds (pronounced Tibbals), which became King James's
summer residence. See E. H. Sugden's 'Topographical Dictionary to the
Works of Shakespeare and his Fellow Dramatists' (Manchester, 1920) -  he
doesn't refer to animals, but I have a feeling there's at least one book
about the house.

> 3.  A simple remark: "For linnen breeches, though some think them
> cleanly, in my opinion they imitate a Dutch Stove too much."  Were Dutch
> stoves prone to collect soot?

It might be worth investigating 'Dutch oven' (OED, oven, 2a (a))

> 4.  What are the "eight severall weapons" of fencing?

I should think Charles Edelman, author of 'Brawl Ridiculous, might
answer this one.!
>
> 6.  Who was Duke de Memorency?  not in DNB, OED, Enclcl. Brit. 11th ed.,
> or current Encycl. Brit. index.

Presumably you've tried under Montmorency?
>
> 7.  I have been unable to trace the following which appear to be
> allusions to song lyrics or song titles "Adam Bell," "Clim oth' Clough,"
> "We be three," and  "Good Mr. William of Cloudesly."  I have spent a
> good deal of time with various books including the Roxburghe Ballads,
> William Chappell's Old English Popular Music, Musical Ayres and
> Dialogues, by Wilson and Colman, Britain's Bowere of Delight, and
> Day's  English Song Books.

For the ballad of Adam Bell, Clim of the Clough, and William of
Cloudesley, see  Thomas Percy's 'Reliques of Ancient English Poetry',
Vol. 1, pp. 151-79.

Stanley Wells
 

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