1998

SSLC Homepage

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0417  Monday, 4 May 1998.

From:           Paul Franssen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 04 May 1998 11:15:43 +0200
Subject:        Announcing home-page

Dear Fellow-SHAKSPERians,

The Shakespeare Society of the Low Countries has just opened its
home-page at http://shakespeare.let.ruu.nl/ The page is bilingual, Dutch
and English.  In the years to come, we are hoping to extend the site
into a useful resource for all scholars who are interested in
Shakespeare studies in general, and in Dutch and Flemish contributions
to Shakespeare scholarship, translations, performances and so on, in
particular. Any suggestions are welcome.

Paul Franssen
Treasurer SSLC
Dept. of English
Utrecht University
The Netherlands

Q: Elizabethan Staging

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0416  Monday, 4 May 1998.

From:           Ron Ward <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 3 May 1998 10:16:07 +1200 (NZST)
Subject:        Elizabethan Staging

I have just been talking to a friend who is a professional actor and
took part in a recent production of Comedy of Errors at Bats Theatre in
Wellington New Zealand. He tells me that they used Elizabethan rehearsal
and production methods. This means that each cast member was given copy
containing only their own lines and cues from the last few words of the
previous speaker. Apparently this was done to prevent pirating. A prompt
sheet was pinned up backstage with fuller but by no means complete
directions, and a prompt to try to sort out any confusion on stage. This
also meant there was no blocking of the action and a great deal was
expected of the actors in the use of stagecraft. E.g. on the first night
the speaker of lines may not have been unobscured by other players. The
prompt was essential in sorting out problems. My friend described it as
living on the edge but no worse than sight reading music from part
scores. Has anyone else tried this? Has the new Globe tried this? If
they have used Elizabethan underwear for authenticity they should try
out the production methods also.  Perhaps our current methods show too
much organisation and not enough spontaneity. Any comments?

Ron Ward

Re: Anagram; Jenning's Hamlet

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0414  Monday, 4 May 1998.

[1]     From:   John Owen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 1 May 1998 15:18:09 EDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0410  Re: Amazing Anagram

[2]     From:   Michael Ullyot <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 1 May 1998 16:52:44 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0411  Alex Jenning's Hamlet


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Owen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 1 May 1998 15:18:09 EDT
Subject: 9.0410  Re: Amazing Anagram
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0410  Re: Amazing Anagram

>>I don't get it!

> I do, and it is pretty amazing... Take all the letters in the first
 >sentence, and rearrange them. One of the possible sentences you can
come
 >up with is the second.

I'm from Missouri... show me!

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Michael Ullyot <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 1 May 1998 16:52:44 -0400
Subject: 9.0411  Alex Jenning's Hamlet
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0411  Alex Jenning's Hamlet

John McWilliams asks for observations on Alex Jenning's Hamlet in the
RSC production.  As I ordered my tickets for the RST in Stratford I was
warned that it was to be played in modern dress, as if this was a
detraction. On the contrary, with Alex Jenning's performance it was the
best I had ever seen.  The opening sequence with the scratchy home
movies of the Hamlets in happier times certainly stressed the
egregiousness of Claudius' fratricide, and (as McWilliams suggests) the
centrality of the trap door- particularly in the initial Rosencrantz &
Guildenstern scene, with their invasion of Hamlet's private, attic-like
chambers-was a production element I'm still mulling over. Any more
thoughts about this trap door, besides the valences of the gravesite?

Michael Ullyot

Re: the Onlie Begetter

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0415  Monday, 4 May 1998.

[1]     From:   W. L. Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 01 May 1998 18:26:45 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0413  Re: the Onlie Begetter

[2]     From:   An Sonjae <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 4 May 1998 09:55:14 +0900 (KST)
        Subj:   Re: Sonnets


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W. L. Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 01 May 1998 18:26:45 -0400
Subject: 9.0413  Re: the Onlie Begetter
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0413  Re: the Onlie Begetter

> Maybe, the Onlie Begetter is Shakespeare, and the editor printer was
> inscribing it to him as a familiar name-W.H. being the equivalent of
> say, JP for JP Jones.  Did anyone have middle names back then?

Actually a British scholar whose name evades me (Honigmann? Jenkins?),
has suggested that, since in the secretary hand a long {s} might very
well look like an "h," the initials may have been "W. S." in the
manuscript, and misread by the compositor as W. H.

This explanation supposes that Thorpe (and/or Shakespeare himself) did
not read proof, and that Eld's proofreader didn't pick up the mistake.
If this printing was commissioned by Shakespeare himself, does this seem
likely?  Maybe. Maybe an author always expects his or her name to be
spelled correctly!

Yours,  W. H. Godshalk

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           An Sonjae <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 4 May 1998 09:55:14 +0900 (KST)
Subject:        Re: Sonnets

I have the impression that the problem with the Dedication starts with
the Romantic fascination with the identity of the Young Man; the text of
the sonnets offers no clear clue. The Dedication mentions an apparently
mysterious Mr. W.H. who is described as 'the onlie Begetter'. As a
result (in my reading) the word Begetter is forced away from its obvious
meaning of 'author' and the reference to our ever-living poet is made to
refer to Shakespeare. I simply cannot understand why Blakemore Evans
finds this latter interpretation 'forced' but I expect that I am being
obtuse.

An Sonjae
Sogang University, Seoul

Re: the Onlie Begetter; Audio Macbeth

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0413  Friday, 1 May 1998.

[1]     From:   Laura Fargas <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 30 Apr 1998 12:09:33 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0403  Re: the Onlie Begetter

[2]     From:   John Owen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 30 Apr 1998 23:03:47 EDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0407  Q: Audio Macbeth


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Laura Fargas <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 30 Apr 1998 12:09:33 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 9.0403  Re: the Onlie Begetter
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0403  Re: the Onlie Begetter

Joe Shea wrote:

> Maybe, the Onlie Begetter is Shakespeare, and the editor printer was
> inscribing it to him as a familiar name-W.H. being the equivalent of
> say, JP for JP Jones.  Did anyone have middle names back then?

There's a thought!  I can certainly recall that, when in a somewhat
exercised frame of mind, my father attributed an equally uncanonical
middle initial H to Jesus Christ.

Laura Fargas

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Owen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 30 Apr 1998 23:03:47 EDT
Subject: 9.0407  Q: Audio Macbeth
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0407  Q: Audio Macbeth

>I am looking for audio cassettes of Shakespeare's Macbeth. Would any one
>suggest any in particular? Thank you.

The best complete recording of Macbeth is from Harper Audio, featuring
Anthony Quayle and Gwen Frangcon-Davies. If you are interested, I can
find an address for you, but you should be able to order it from any
large bookstore. For a while, a Canadian company called "listening for
pleasure" was issuing the Angel-EMI recording with Alec Guinness and
Pamela Brown, but Guinness was strangely muted here and the result is
unsatisfactory. The best performance of Macbeth on audio is,
unfortunately, abridged-Michael Redgrave and Barbara Jefford for the
Living Shakespeare series-but still very powerful.

John Owen

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