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Home :: Archive :: 1998 :: December ::
Re: Branagh; GRE; Flip Wilson; Honan
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.1216  Wednesday, 2 December 1998.

[1]     From:   Chris J. Fassler <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 01 Dec 1998 08:33:23 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Branagh

[2]     From:   David Lindley <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 1 Dec 1998 15:36:24 GMT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.1210  Importance of GRE

[3]     From:   Helen Ostovich <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 1 Dec 1998 12:40:04 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.1203  A Tribute to Flip Wilson

[4]     From:   Jonathan Hope <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 01 Dec 1998 14:43:16 +0000 (GMT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.1213  Re: Honan


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Chris J. Fassler <
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Date:           Tuesday, 01 Dec 1998 08:33:23 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Branagh

Yes, now that you mention it, I can see Scarlett O'Hara in Branaugh's
Hamlet.

Can anyone help me understand my FIRST reaction to the "How all
occasions" scene--made me (shudder to) think of George C. Scott's
Patton?

Curiously,
--Chris

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Lindley <
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Date:           Tuesday, 1 Dec 1998 15:36:24 GMT
Subject: 9.1210  Importance of GRE
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.1210  Importance of GRE

It's probably not relevant to almost everybody on the list, but for us
in the UK I think the most important thing in securing admission to an
MA programme is the quality of the written work we ask to be submitted
with the application, followed by the references (though the 'open'
reference common in the States has less weight than a confidential
reference).

For Ph.D admission the thing that really matters is the quality of the
research proposal.

(And we are very happy to welcome applicants from the USA - we don't get
enough of them!)

David Lindley
School of English
University of Leeds

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Helen Ostovich <
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Date:           Tuesday, 1 Dec 1998 12:40:04 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 9.1203  A Tribute to Flip Wilson
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.1203  A Tribute to Flip Wilson

I was saddened to hear of Flip Wilson's death, and surprised that I
hadn't heard of it anywhere beyond this list.  I guess I don't watch
enough TV.  What ever happened to his career?  I always thought of him
as a great example of persuasive transvestitism, and a splendid argument
for the positive representation of women by male actors, whether boys or
men.  Wherever you are, Flip, if you've got it, flaunt it!

Helen

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jonathan Hope <
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Date:           Tuesday, 01 Dec 1998 14:43:16 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: 9.1213  Re: Honan
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.1213  Re: Honan

> In any case, in the sixteenth century, names seem to have been spelled
> (vaguely) phonetically (e.g., Morley for Marlowe). Is there any chance
> that Whateley is a variant of Hathaway? It sounds (as my students say)
> like a stretch, but I'm wondering if Whately could have been pronounced
> Hateley which might be close enough to Hate-away for a sixteenth century
> clerk.

The written names <Whateley> and <Hathaway> look very different, but
phonetically they are very close, so I'd say it's entirely possible that
they could be written forms of the same name, given early modern
variation in pronunciation and spelling.

Jonathan Hope
Middlesex University
 

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