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Home :: Archive :: 1998 :: December ::
Re: Plagiarism
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.1233  Friday, 4 December 1998.

[1]     From:   Andrew Murphy <
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        Date:   Thursday, 3 Dec 1998 12:06:32 +0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.1232  Re: Plagiarism

[2]     From:   Gabriel Egan <
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        Date:   Thursday, 3 Dec 1998 09:18:04 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.1232  Re: Plagiarism

[3]     From:   Penelope Rixon <
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        Date:   Thursday, 3 Dec 1998 12:39:51 -0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.1232  Re: Plagiarism

[4]     From:   Kathleen Hannah <
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        Date:   Thursday, 3 Dec 1998 14:03:28 CST6CDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.1232  Re: Plagiarism

[5]     From:   Leslie Fields <
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        Date:   Thursday, 3 Dec 1998 12:26:27 -0900
        Subj:   Re: Fwd: SHK 9.1224  Plagiarism

[6]     From:   David H. Maruyama <
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        Date:   Thursday, 3 Dec 1998 23:55:57 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.1232  Re: Plagiarism


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Andrew Murphy <
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Date:           Thursday, 3 Dec 1998 12:06:32 +0000
Subject: 9.1232  Re: Plagiarism
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.1232  Re: Plagiarism

I, too, was pretty amazed by the plagiarism posting. I've seen one or
two sites like this in the past, but most of them offer some sort of fig
leaf denial of their real intent (to sell essays for fraudulent
submission). The blatancy of this one is astonishing (as is the
site-owner's brass neck in seeking to have it advertised on the Globe
site!)

I wondered whether the academic community generally is taking any action
on these sites. I understand that there are complex issues of net
censorship involved. But even if these sites are not to be driven off
the net, shouldn't the academic community at least be filling up their
email inboxes with messages telling them how we feel about what they are
doing?

Cheers,
Andrew

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Gabriel Egan <
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Date:           Thursday, 3 Dec 1998 09:18:04 -0500
Subject: 9.1232  Re: Plagiarism
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.1232  Re: Plagiarism

The essay-ordering service drawn to our attention by Chantal
Muller-Schutz doesn't deliver as rapidly as it claims. Yesterday I
ordered an essay on "Is Othello a racist play?", cash-on-delivery, and
am still waiting.

(I wouldn't get too worried about students using this service-just look
out for the character "Poolingbrooke" in Richard 2 and you'll know where
the essay came from.)

Gabriel Egan

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Penelope Rixon <
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Date:           Thursday, 3 Dec 1998 12:39:51 -0000
Subject: 9.1232  Re: Plagiarism
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.1232  Re: Plagiarism

Simon:

I agree with you, but I suppose this development is simply a logical
response to market forces in some people's book!  I doubt whether the
site is administered by a 'true academic' as you'd use the term,
though.  In fact, there are several of these wretched sites on the Net;
one of the down sides of the new medium.  My only hope is that most
students will be too honest to use them, and those who aren't will be
too poor, which is quite likely in this country.  Incidentally, it seems
to me that the existence of this kind of resource is a strong argument
for keeping conventional exams as a major part of assessment of academic
ability.

Penny

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Kathleen Hannah <
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Date:           Thursday, 3 Dec 1998 14:03:28 CST6CDT
Subject: 9.1232  Re: Plagiarism
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.1232  Re: Plagiarism

I don't think we're talking about "true academics," here, but
undergraduate students. Having just been through my semesterly battle
with plagiarists, I've been wondering whether there are any plans to
make a SHAXICON-like computer program that would allow teachers to
electronically compare students' in-class writing with their
out-of-class writing. I know it would probably not work 100%, but it
might back up some cases that go before plagiarism committees.  Anyone
heard of any such thing?

Katie Hannah

[5]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Leslie Fields <
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Date:           Thursday, 3 Dec 1998 12:26:27 -0900
Subject: SHK 9.1224  Plagiarism
Comment:        Re: Fwd: SHK 9.1224  Plagiarism

Mike,

What a philanthropist this hoodlum is!  How thoughtful of him to provide
essays at so reasonable a cost. Think of all the agony and ecstasy he is
saving student-consumers.  (This, of course, only reinforces education
as a commodity; students as consumers in a largely business transaction,
upon completion of which, they expect to earn larger salaries than had
they not purchased the sheepskin)

Thanks for the tip.   This is why I walk with my students through the
(all too) painful process of generating ideas, formulating outlines,
rough draft, etc., so by the time the paper is due,  I KNOW it has
sprung, been dragged, rather, from their own brain cells.

A cheery Thursday to you!

Leslie

[6]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David H. Maruyama <
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Date:           Thursday, 3 Dec 1998 23:55:57 EST
Subject: 9.1232  Re: Plagiarism
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.1232  Re: Plagiarism

Greetings:

Fortunately, I don't think I have seen a "purchased" essay submitted in
my comp classes (being a gypsy English teacher).  Of course, I could be
wrong.  The sale and distribution of essays is not something new.  I
remember an undergraduate (while I was an undergraduate) who purchased
their stuff for assignments in English Composition.  I thought this was
most idiotic.  I was willing to try to write an essay, versus pay
anyone.   I hated to pay for anything unnecessary; I needed the money to
pay for more Top Ramen.

A poor starving student is not likely to try it.  A rich student might,
because they can afford it.  My experience has been that the rich can
afford the rather high prices demanded.  80 dollars for an A paper was
the figure at the time (1991).  I wanted to eat, so I spent my time
typing in the lab.

Giving up an essay to these guys is giving them free money.  You do the
work; they get some more dollars.  Unfortunately, there is a market for
this stuff.  The more the market demands; the more you will see these
types of enterprises.  The internet is a convenient medium to increase
sales.  This web page might be real attractive to a freshman.

Nowadays, I don't think students look at a college education as an
education.  They look at the degree in terms of potential income
afterwards.  The idea behind the sale of essays is to make the process
easy.  Buy the degree.  The payback will be good anyways.  This is
sad.

d maruyama
 

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