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Home :: Archive :: 1998 :: December ::
Re: Two questions
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.1272  Wednesday, 9 December 1998.

[1]     From:   Helen Ostovich <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 8 Dec 1998 12:17:07 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.1261  Two questions

[2]     From:   Takashi Kozuka <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 08 Dec 1998 15:00:55 PST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.1261 Two questions


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Helen Ostovich <
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Date:           Tuesday, 8 Dec 1998 12:17:07 -0500
Subject: 9.1261  Two questions
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.1261  Two questions

Re #1, on "dead men's fingers" = testiculus canis, dogstones or dog's
testicles; also called dog's cods, fool's ballocks, etc.

Re #2: on urinals: see 1H4 2.1, in which visitors at the inn complain
about having to take a leak in the fireplace, because no other facility
was available inside.  The result, aside from the stench, was abundant
insect life.  Falstaff, however, has a famous entrance line in 2H4
calling for a "jordan" or urinal, so some inns kept them available for
customers.

Helen Ostovich
Editor, EARLY THEATRE / Dept of English CNH-321
McMaster University

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Takashi Kozuka <
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Date:           Tuesday, 08 Dec 1998 15:00:55 PST
Subject: 9.1261 Two questions
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.1261 Two questions

According to The Norton Shakespeare, '[a]mong the recorded names for the
purple orchis are "priest's-pintle" (penis), "dog's cullions"
(testicles), "goat's cullions", and "fool's ballochs"' (p. 1740).  The
4th edition of David Bevington's The Complete Works of Shakespeare
explains that these names have their origins in the tubers of the orchis
which resemble testicles.

Takashi Kozuka
PhD Student
Centre for the Study of the Renaissance
University of Warwick (UK)
 

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