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Home :: Archive :: 1998 :: December ::
Re: Plagiarism
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.1303  Wednesday, 16 December 1998.

[1]     From:   David Hale <
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        Date:   Monday, 14 Dec 98 11:43:42 EST
        Subj:   re: SHAKSPER: SHK 9.1297 Re: Plagiarism

[2]     From:   Stephanie Hughes <
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        Date:   Monday, 14 Dec 1998 08:33:37 +0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.1297  Re: Plagiarism

[3]     From:   Michael Ullyot <
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        Date:   Monday, 14 Dec 1998 17:38:16 +0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.1297  Re: Plagiarism

[4]     From:   Sally Schutz <
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        Date:   Monday, 14 Dec 1998 16:25:15 PST
        Subj:   Re: Plagiarism

[5]     From:   Franklin J. Hildy <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 15 Dec 1998 16:50:35 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.1297  Re: Plagiarism

[6]     From:   Sally Schutz <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 15 Dec 1998 14:57:19 PST
        Subj:   Re: Plagiarism


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Hale <
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Date:           Monday, 14 Dec 98 11:43:42 EST
Subject: SHK 9.1297 Re: Plagiarism
Comment:        re: SHAKSPER: SHK 9.1297 Re: Plagiarism

Just a brief note on plagiarism, this being the time of year when
borrowed leaves do hang upon the boughs. I just had my first experience
with an essay lifted from an internet source, in this case an MA thesis
on Spenser.  When I wrote the essay in "Shakespeare and the Classroom"
(which Eva McManus summarized some weeks ago), only colleagues and
friends had been presented with material from the web. The student is
presently unable to explain the essential identity of her paragraphs
with the thesis.  Putting in a few sentence fragments didn't disguise
much.  Some observations: 1) posting work by students (including
graduate students) may not be a very good idea; 2) assignments which are
wholly or partially directed to close readings of texts help avoid
plagiarism; 3) awareness of the web as a possible source of plagiarism
may speed up one's detective work. Some students are still dim enough to
copy from the Cliffs Notes, but more of them turn first to the internet.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Stephanie Hughes <
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Date:           Monday, 14 Dec 1998 08:33:37 +0000
Subject: 9.1297  Re: Plagiarism
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.1297  Re: Plagiarism

> Lisa Hopkins wrote:
>
> > It is certainly true that a student can far outshine their own previous
> > work.
>
> Does syntax count?

Not in this case.

I applaud Lisa Hopkins for the courage to join the effort to reform the
present male-oriented "syntax" (whose "syn" I might ask?) that forces us
to chose among 1) male or female, 2) awkward he/she or him/her, or 3)
plural, every time we use a pronoun. After banging my head against this
hardwired sexist grammatical construction, eventually I opted for the
far less obtrusive "themself," and damn the grammarians. If they don't
like it they can come up with something that works better.

Stephanie Hughes

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Michael Ullyot <
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Date:           Monday, 14 Dec 1998 17:38:16 +0000
Subject: 9.1297  Re: Plagiarism
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.1297  Re: Plagiarism

Sometimes Hardy's arrangements of randomly-arriving emails can be rather
fortuitous. First comes Larry Weiss's correction of Lisa Hopkins' "a
student can far outshine their own previous work," closely followed by
Linda Stumbaugh's well-timed comment:

>Look at the
>quality of our own e-mails, many written in haste.  How many of us >would like to be judged on these?

Indeed. Larry's correction was duly noted, I'm sure, but cluttered the
list with petty marginalia.

Michael Ullyot

[Editor's Note: For anyone who is interested, I organize postings into
digests generally in the order in which they appear in my mailbox.  The
order in which the digests arrive at your site is completely a function
of how those packets are transported across the Internet.  HMC]

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sally Schutz <
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Date:           Monday, 14 Dec 1998 16:25:15 PST
Subject:        Re: Plagiarism

I am a 16-year-old student and here is some useful insight on the mind
of students that I have forever yearned to levy on a teacher.  This
isn't about plagiarism; it is however about the mentality of students.
Due to lack of interest or passion on my own part for the subject on
which I am writing, my papers in these situations turn out bland and
generic. However, given a topic I feel strongly about or wish to find
new insight into, I can write witty, thoroughly researched, original
papers. This seems to have become the source of intense animosity on the
part of several teachers I have had in the past. I also have a system of
selective participation when it comes to school. I refuse to do "busy
work" on subjects which I require no further instruction on (at least up
to the capabilities of those doing the instructing). Hmm...looking at
what I just wrote, it sounds incredibly pompous, but I assure you, as I
assure my teachers, I do not mean it in that way. It's simply the way I
feel. I'm not trying to incite a mass rebellion against the school
system; I just play it the way that works for me and for my acquiring of
knowledge.

 -Sally

[5]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Franklin J. Hildy <
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Date:           Tuesday, 15 Dec 1998 16:50:35 -0500
Subject: 9.1297  Re: Plagiarism
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.1297  Re: Plagiarism

For all of you who are worried about plagiarism you might be interested
in this note I received via another list.

Curses!  Foiled again.  A new Internet site has been developed to help
professors sniff out plagiarism in term papers and research reports.
For a fee, the new IntegriGuard site checks the text of a submitted
paper against the text of all the papers in its database.  No points off
for grammatical errors, the service issues only a "pass" or "fail" grade
to the tested paper.  According to the developers, IntegriGuard's
database includes about 600 papers, most of which were purchased from
so-called term-paper mills.

All papers submitted will also be added to the database.  Universities
around the world have reported a significant rise in plagiarism in
connection with the more wide-scale accessibility of the Web.

Franklin J.  Hildy

[6]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sally Schutz <
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Date:           Tuesday, 15 Dec 1998 14:57:19 PST
Subject:        Re: Plagiarism

Okay, I feel like a filthy bugger, doing this, but as a high school
student, I am fully aware of the sites on which one can download
ready-written papers on almost any topic. I want everyone to be aware
that I am doing this only in reference to Shakespeare and other
Renaissance writing because I believe that it is insane for students in
college to take a course that they are not willing to do the work
themselves for. But I feel like I'm betraying the foundations of my
being by doing this, so please, any professors that are in need of these
site listings, contact me off list. but in order to satisfy my own
personal code of morals, principles, and ethics, I will only give this
to college professors, and not high school teachers. Sorry.

 -Sally Schutz
 

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