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Home :: Archive :: 1998 :: December ::
Re: Plagiarism
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.1319  Friday, 18 December 1998.

[1]     From:   Carol Barton <
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        Date:   Thursday, 17 Dec 1998 16:51:19 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.1310  Re: Plagiarism

[2]     From:   Sean Lawrence <
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        Date:   Thursday, 17 Dec 1998 17:28:25 -0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.1310  Re: Plagiarism

[3]     From:   Richard A. Burt <
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        Date:   Thursday, 17 Dec 1998 23:01:33 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: Plagiarism

[4]     From:   Linda Stumbaugh <
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        Date:   Thursday, 17 Dec 1998 21:17:35 -0800
        Subj:   Post from Simon Malloch


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Carol Barton <
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Date:           Thursday, 17 Dec 1998 16:51:19 EST
Subject: 9.1310  Re: Plagiarism
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.1310  Re: Plagiarism

In a message dated 12/17/98 3:52:19 PM Eastern Standard Time, Simon
Malloch
<
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 > writes:

>Still, I would go further and say that students should not be allowed to
> post queries asking for directions with regards to research, i.e.  "can
> anyone refer me to books about..."  I have noticed over the last few
> years a number of posts of this nature,  some of which are very basic
> and clearly demonstrate that the student has not done even the most
> minimal research.

Yes.  There is a difference between helping someone, and doing his or
her work outright.  I get lots of requests from lazy scholars (since I
am on a commercial Internet provider, I think), but I also get
legitimate inquiries from young people who have done their best to find
what they need, and are stumped as to where to go next.  I send the
former to the text, or the library . . . the latter merit help, even of
the "books [or articles] about" kind.

The folks on Milton-L  just handled a similar flurry of naive questions
about heroism in Paradise Lost rather diplomatically, I thought, by
virtual silence.  The kids talked among themselves as if they were in a
chatroom, then gave up, when they realized none of the "heavy hitters"
were paying them any attention.

Carol Barton

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean Lawrence <
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 >
Date:           Thursday, 17 Dec 1998 17:28:25 -0800
Subject: 9.1310  Re: Plagiarism
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.1310  Re: Plagiarism

>Still, I would go further and say that students should not be allowed to
>post queries asking for directions with regards to research, i.e.  "can
>anyone refer me to books about..."

Should everyone be forbidden from asking for bibliographic guidance?  I
think that I've done so in the past, and it strikes me as being one of
the greatest uses of a list like this.  While bibliographies will tell
you what's been published in a particular area, they won't tell you how
the publications were received, which studies are considered classics,
etc.

Cheers,
Sean.

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard A. Burt <
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Date:           Thursday, 17 Dec 1998 23:01:33 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Re: Plagiarism

Thought the following would be of interest to those following the
plagiarism thread.

Best,
Richard

From:       Katherine Agar <
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In message Keith Dills writes:
Dear Kathy Agar,

I would very much like to know any way you use to catch plagiarism.  I
assume  you use a search engine, but I'd like to know the details!
Thanks!
Keith Dills
[
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 ]

Keith and others:

Here is the technique.  If a paper seems to borrow ideas and phrasing
wholesale, you can sometimes track down the plagiarized item without
sorting through subject-indexed material.

1. Go to Hotbot at  http://www.hotbot.com  (a search engine)
2. In the space provided, enter 3 or 4 slightly unusual but identifying
words in the paper, then run it. Hotbot indexes every word on a web
page, so it will find the occurrence of that combination of words.  My
colleagues have found source papers on the first hit.

Links about plagiarism can be found at
http://www.faculty.ehc.edu/users/fmitchel/intplag.htm

Kathy Agar

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Linda Stumbaugh <
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Date:           Thursday, 17 Dec 1998 21:17:35 -0800
Subject:        Post from Simon Malloch

Re Simon Malloch's comment:

"Still, I would go further and say that students should not be allowed
to post queries asking for directions with regards to research, i.e.
'can anyone refer me to books about...'  I have noticed over the last
few years a number of posts of this nature,  some of which are very
basic and clearly demonstrate that the student has not done even the
most minimal research.  If students cannot use the library nor scan
bibliographies then they should learn how to do so.  Asking for such
directions is not far off buying an essay from the internet.  List
members are not here to do research for students, not for anyone for
that matter."

You might be interested to know that there are places where people do
not have access to academic libraries and have to rely on local or
community college libraries.  I live in such a place.  The nearest
academic library is half a day's ride away. I must rely on interlibrary
loan to receive articles and books that I need.  I often have to pay for
these items.  I make twice yearly pilgrimages to the big city to catch
up. The local community college does not have the MLA bibliography (or
any other major literay bibliographies) in their collections.  The
Internet, and this discussion group, help point me in the directions
research is or is not going.

As a woman who works full time to support a family and who is also
trying to write a dissertation (and, always, a student), I do not expect
to be accused of not doing my own research or relying on the work of
someone else (as if we all didn't do that in one way or another) when I
pose a query on this list.  At the risk of sounding Pollyannish, I had
believed that there was a spirit of academic (and even non-academic)
cooperation and camaraderie that fostered such lists as these in the
first place.

Yours,
Linda Stumbaugh
 

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