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Home :: Archive :: 1998 :: December ::
Re: Cats; Rites; Titus
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.1320  Friday, 18 December 1998.

[1]     From:   Roy Flannagan <
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        Date:   Thursday, 17 Dec 1998 10:36:58 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.1314  Re: Rom. "cazzo"

[2]     From:   Timothy Peterson <
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        Date:   Thursday, 17 Dec 1998 12:46:23 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.1306  Re: H5; MND

[3]     From:   Sean Lawrence <
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        Date:   Thursday, 17 Dec 1998 17:30:47 -0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.1312  Re: Titus Andronicus


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Roy Flannagan <
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Date:           Thursday, 17 Dec 1998 10:36:58 -0500
Subject: 9.1314  Re: Rom. "cazzo"
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.1314  Re: Rom. "cazzo"

Though I think that Shakespeare especially in the early comedies and
tragedies will use a dirty pun whenever he can manage to fit it in, I
have some problems with Prince of Cats as a pun on "cazzo," even though
I had a friend whose name was Katz whose introduction always caused
snickers among Florentines.  Tybalt is also described as a princox, a
presumptuous and arrogant young man, an aggressive twit, a tomcat
constantly yowling to prove his manhood.  Isn't that enough to make him
Prince of Cats?  Also, if Shakespeare wanted to pun on "cazzo," why
would he do that for an audience that, for the most part, couldn't be
expected to get the Italian joke?

Roy Flannagan

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Timothy Peterson <
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Date:           Thursday, 17 Dec 1998 12:46:23 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 9.1306  Re: H5; MND
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.1306  Re: H5; MND

> Chris Gordon wrote (paraphrasing) that in the Catholic faith a sincere
> Act of contrition can take the place of final confession. I must ask,
> however, how many men, having not been slain instantly, dying on a
> battlefield of gaping, horrific, wounds, have the clarity of mind to
> rise beyond their excruciating world of pain to make a full act of
> contrition? -Sally Schutz

I don't disagree, however there' an alternative argument that he'd be
thinking of nothing but an act of contrition.  Evidence from history: in
Anglo-American common law, the "Dying Declaration" is one of the older
exceptions to the evidentiary rule against hearsay.  Certain statements
made by a person in anticipation of death are considered inherently
reliable because, as one is dying, one's thoughts naturally turn to
judgement in the afterlife.  And lying on your way in isn't the best way
to start your case for a halo and wings.

--T.

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean Lawrence <
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Date:           Thursday, 17 Dec 1998 17:30:47 -0800
Subject: 9.1312  Re: Titus Andronicus
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.1312  Re: Titus Andronicus

Sir Anthony was quoted by Campus Reel or some similar publication that
we get in Vancouver saying that he was so intense about acting that "If
I wasn't an actor, I'd probably be a serial killer."

That's what really frightens me about this announcement!

Cheers,
Sean.
 

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