Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 1998 :: December ::
Re: Titus Andronicus
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.1321  Monday, 21 December 1998.

[1]     From:   Terence Hawkes <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Friday, 18 Dec 1998 13:10:05 -0500
        Subj:   SHK 9.1312

[2]     From:   Jason N. Mical <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Friday, 18 Dec 1998 21:36:58 -0600
        Subj:   Titus

[3]     From:   Jerry Bangham <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Saturday, 19 Dec 1998 21:47:41 -0600
        Subj:   Titus in the New York Times


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Terence Hawkes <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Friday, 18 Dec 1998 13:10:05 -0500
Subject: Re: Titus Andronicus
Comment:        SHK 9.1312 Re: Titus Andronicus

'the rest of the world must simply stand by with our mouths gaping
open.' Sally Schutz's chagrin over the professional demise of 'Sir
Hopkins' as she terms him will be shared throughout Wales, where mouths
are traditionally cavernous. I recall that Londoners were similarly hung
up over the death of Stephen Spender, who became known, in consequence,
as  'Sir Spender'.  Something to do with their morays, I expect.

T. Hawkes

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jason N. Mical <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Friday, 18 Dec 1998 21:36:58 -0600
Subject:        Titus

I apologize for the delay in my follow-up to the posts about Titus being
a bawd.  I moved back home for break on Wednesday and did not get my
internet connection working until now.

I read Titus as part of an undergraduate research course I took this
last semester, the object of which was to focus on ethical issues in
Shakespeare.  We read Titus more as a joke than anything else, and
unless I am missing something profound (in all my undergraduate wisdom
grin), the play seemed to me to be an early version of some later
tragedies, notably Richard III, Hamlet, and Coriolanus.  Or, to be more
precise, I noticed elements / scenes from each of these plays in Titus.

There seems to be no ethical lesson to the play.  Someone made a joke
about its appealing to modern audiences because of the appalling amount
of violence (apologies for not cutting and pasting your name, gentle
scholar).  Indeed, it would seem that Shakespeare's audiences liked
violence as much as Americans do today, because I can see no other
reason to write this play.  The Aristotelian appeal for a middle path is
not to be found anywhere in Titus unless I am horribly mistaken.  It was
interesting to read it and compare it to Shakespeare's other works, but
I see no real value to the play except as a curiosity, in much the same
way that _Inventions of the March Hare_ is a curiosity to T. S. Eliot's
readers.

Jason Mical
Drury College

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jerry Bangham <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Saturday, 19 Dec 1998 21:47:41 -0600
Subject:        Titus in the New York Times

There is an interesting article on Julie Taymor's film of "Titus" in the
New York Times. I just read it in the online edition at:


http://www.nytimes.com/yr/mo/day/artleisure/taymor-titus-film.html

Jerry Bangham    http:/www.win.net/~kudzu
 

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.