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Home :: Archive :: 1998 :: December ::
Re: Plagiarism
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.1339  Sunday, 27 December 1998.

[1]     From:   John Robinson <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 22 Dec 1998 13:34:26 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.1327  Re: Plagiarism

[2]     From:   Sally Schutz <
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        Date:   Saturday, 26 Dec 1998 17:28:25 PST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.1325 Re: Plagiarism


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Robinson <
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Date:           Tuesday, 22 Dec 1998 13:34:26 EST
Subject: 9.1327  Re: Plagiarism
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.1327  Re: Plagiarism

>Perhaps you should re-read my post.

> There is a difference between a lazy scholar (who knows how to use the
>library and the reference materials available to him or her, and would
>rather take the easy way out) and someone who needs guidance.

>Your kind of shoot-from-the-hip response is exactly what you're accusing
> me of doing, utterly without warrant (I am in fact a firm believer in
>the Socratic method).

 >I would suggest, physician, that thou heal thyself.

 >Carol Barton

Well, many posts have a shoot from the hip quality. I'm sorry if I
seemed harsh but the overall tone of your post seemed, to me, to be a
little ridged.

You wrote in your original post:

"The folks on Milton-L  just handled a similar flurry of naive questions
about heroism in Paradise Lost rather diplomatically, I thought, by
virtual silence.  The kids talked among themselves as if they were in a
chatroom, then gave up, when they realized none of the "heavy hitters"
were paying them any attention."

Your use of such language as "naive questions" and "kids" who  behaved
"as if they were in a chat room" struck me as a little condescending.
I'm on the Milton list too. I didn't see anything suspect about the
question posed. The post actually generated quite a few responses-not
all of them from "kids."

But, so what if the chatty kids get on list, a least they're talking
about Milton. The vaunted silence of the "heavy-hitters" isn't a good
thing.  Shouldn't we, as English teachers, be Shakespeare and Milton's
best ambassadors?

To chatty kids and heavy-hitters alike I say "Welcome friends, and Merry
Christmas"

John Robinson

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sally Schutz <
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 >
Date:           Saturday, 26 Dec 1998 17:28:25 PST
Subject: 9.1325 Re: Plagiarism
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.1325 Re: Plagiarism

"Responding to Sally Schutz's posting of 12/15: Tell me, Sally, what
"personal code of morals, principles, and ethics" would prevent you from
clueing us high school teachers in on Internet sites for plagiarized
papers.  Is it just a matter of "us versus them"?  If so, what answer
would you give to the teacher who responds that student plagiarism is an
impediment to our efforts to teach writing to our students, preparing
them to succeed in college and beyond?  Wouldn't you agree that students
who write their own papers learn to become better writers, while those
who plagiarize whole papers learn nothing, except how to cheat? What's
your thinking on this?"

Sorry I have not responded sooner to this post, I promise I haven't been
in hiding, Christmas is frightfully busy, and this is the first free
moment I've had. Now, I believe that what goes around comes around, and
those students who don't do their own work are punished by their
subsequent lack of skill and ability in that department. Those who
plagiarize eventually find themselves in way over their heads when they
are presented with a situation in which they are expected to write a
paper and are not able to plagiarize in their accustomed fashion. Oh, I
must be off, so I'm forced to cut this short, but I'm quite willing to
discuss this at greater length later on.          -Sally Schutz
 

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