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Home :: Archive :: 1998 :: December ::
Re: Restored Globe; Ghost; Cats
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.1344  Sunday, 27 December 1998.

[1]     From:   John Drakakis <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 22 Dec 1998 16:37:01 -0000
        Subj:   RE: SHK 9.1330  Restored Globe

[2]     From:   Barbara R. Hume <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 23 Dec 1998 12:54:56 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.1324 Re: Ghost from Purgatory

[3]     From:   William Sutton <
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        Date:   Thursday, 24 Dec 1998 06:19:32 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.1332 Re: Cats


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Drakakis <
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Date:           Tuesday, 22 Dec 1998 16:37:01 -0000
Subject: 9.1330  Restored Globe
Comment:        RE: SHK 9.1330  Restored Globe

Have a look at Graham Holderness's collection, The Shakespeare Myth
1986).

Cheers,
John Drakakis

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Barbara R. Hume <
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Date:           Wednesday, 23 Dec 1998 12:54:56 -0700
Subject: 9.1324 Re: Ghost from Purgatory
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.1324 Re: Ghost from Purgatory

>I have no quarrel at all with the notion that the Elizabethan theater
>engaged issues that arose as a result of the Reformation and
>Counter-Reformation, and that were urgently before the minds of many
>English people in the 1590s, questions of faith, of spiritual knowledge,
>of salvation, of the modes of representation and mediation vouchsafed to
>us by God, etc, etc.  But some recent critics have wanted to take a
>stronger line here, insisting that the theater was in some unexplained
>way a compensation or surrogate for lost spiritual satisfactions, using
>formulations like "the theaters offered their audiences a collective
>theatrical experience much like the one that had been offered by the
>Catholic church".

I have found that many modern critics, having grown up in an age of
atheism and hedonistic humanism, assume that their world view is the one
held by anyone of any real intelligence.  Their assumption is that all
modern readers look with amused scorn on the wrong-headed beliefs of
earlier, supersitious ages. I recall a colleague writing an article on
Milton which discussed Milton's "true" meanings when he talked about
God. Her theory was that she didn't believe in God, no one she knew
believed in God, and therefore no one with an obviously great mind such
as Milton's could possibly believe in God, so he must have meant
something else. Apparently, since it's common today for people to have
no spiritual satisfaction (mainly because they're too busy worshipping
Mammon to listen to God), it must therefore be true that all people are
suffering or did suffer from spiritual malaise. It's truly difficult to
rise above one's own culture enough to see that it isn't the whole of
existence.

Barbara Hume

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           William Sutton <
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Date:           Thursday, 24 Dec 1998 06:19:32 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 9.1332 Re: Cats
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.1332 Re: Cats

Hi everyone and Merry Christmas,

The notes on the italian finally provoke me to reply. I beg to differ
with the note saying Shakespeare and his audience would not understand
the italian, especially bawdy slang words. Elizabethan society received
a classical re-opening of Latin and modern languages (how far a modern
quill doth come too short. Sonnet 76?). Shakespeare's patron the Earl of
Southampton was also patron of John Florio. Many noblemen, soldiers,
adventurers, pilgrims and businessmen would have visited Italy. (See the
Earl of Oxford's sexcapades on the continent). Florio too was the author
of an english italian dictionary published I believe in 1598. Romeo and
Juliet dates from 1597 off the top of my head. Anyone have his
dictionary close by? I checked here at the library of Univ of Amsterdam,
not there. So via the moggy to other quibbles in the notes ( I like the
Tybalt/Tibbles connection, specious though it may be).

I believe it is an essential component of the WWW and Listservs such as
this to share and communicate ideas, sources and research.  Plagiarism
is a whole other story. The person stuck in the middle of nowhere, the
student who first rejected and pointed at the stacks, then tutored in a
one-on-one impromptu fashion are for me clear examples of sharing the
knowledge. The didactics behind the objectionists to this idea are
ignoring the point of this technology.  Shallow people will never get
deeper unless something prompts them to start digging. You never know
what that something is. It may well be a plagiarised paper off the web!!
Or a bazooka Joe cartoon on Shakespeare!!! I appreciate the teacher's
point of view and the solution seems to  be track down and expose the
lie.

It is an iconoclastic medium in which we find ourselves and questions of
copyright and manuscript reproduction have already been and will be
called into question. The important point is that a dialogue is
maintained. My interest is not your interest but we all remain
interested in the end for our own reasons. The good thing about this
list is that we all submit a biography which can be checked (who knows
who told the truth?) if you wish a profile of the person giving a note.

The New Year is almost upon us and Shakespeare's immortal lines are now
almost four hundred years old. Roll on New Year then Titus will be here.
Shakespeare's Love story too (is it fiends or finds for this brother?).
Even Kenneth Br. 1930's musical version of LLL will be welcome. And of
course you people will be here online with the daily Shakey concerns.
Next year I want to talk about First Folios, their census and other
matters of original manuscripts and documentation.

Until then, ciao for now pussycats,

William S.
 

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