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Home :: Archive :: 1998 :: December ::
Re: Tillyard
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.1347  Thursday, 31 December 1998.

[1]     From:   Sean Lawrence <
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        Date:   Sunday, 27 Dec 1998 13:20:31 -0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.1336 Re: Tillyard

[2]     From:   Hugh Grady <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 29 Dec 1998 20:19:51 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.1336 Re: Tillyard


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean Lawrence <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Sunday, 27 Dec 1998 13:20:31 -0800
Subject: 9.1336 Re: Tillyard
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.1336 Re: Tillyard

Hugh Grady writes:

> Certainly Tillyard's
> hegemony was never absolute. It is clear from his "The Muse in Chains"
> that his most influential works grew out of his distaste for F. R.
> Leavis and were meant to be an alternative to the broader New Critical
> movement (to use the American term) altogether. As a whole, Shakespeare
> studies in the 50s and 60s were probably more "New Critical" than
> "Tillyardian." But as we have learned in recent posts, Tillyard's
> influence was remarkably strong in UK secondary education, and as late
> as a work published in 1975, David Bergeron wrote that Tillyard's work
> on the histories "has become the traditional interpretation"
> ("Shakespeare: A Study and Research Guide).

This makes me wonder if Tillyard was always already traditional, even a
bit pass

 

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