1998

Re: Rhetoric

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.1234  Friday, 4 December 1998.

[1]     From:   Harry Hill <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 03 Dec 1998 09:00:12 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.1226  Re: Rhetoric

[2]     From:   Frank Whigham <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 03 Dec 1998 08:00:20 -0600
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.1226  Re: Rhetoric

[3]     From:   Ros King <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 3 Dec 1998 18:06:26
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.1222  Rhetoric

[4]     From:   Anatole Fourmantchouk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 03 Dec 1998 12:43:56 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.1226  Re: Rhetoric


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------


Dale Lyles is correct when he writes that actors [indeed, any reader of
any carefully wrought play, whether by Shakespeare, Racine, Jonson,
Williams, O'Neill, Pinter, Albee or Mamet] need to recognise the shapes
of rhetorical figures more vitally than the Greek names for them. Actors
are in the business of putting shapes to figures.

        Harry Hill
        Montreal

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Frank Whigham <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 03 Dec 1998 08:00:20 -0600
Subject: 9.1226  Re: Rhetoric
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.1226  Re: Rhetoric

For a richly historicized account of how rhetoric in Shakespeare's time
played out, and got played into the political world and the theater, see
my colleague Wayne Rebhorn's fine book The Emperor of Men's Minds:
Literature and the Renaissance Discourse of Rhetoric. Cornell, 1995.

Frank Whigham

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ros King <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 3 Dec 1998 18:06:26 +0000
Subject: 9.1222  Rhetoric
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.1222  Rhetoric

I believe strongly that developing an understanding of, and a practical
feeling for, the rhetorical patterns in Shakespearean language ought to
be an essential element in actor training and an ongoing part of every
rehearsal process - although this doesn't mean that I think we need to
be drilling people in the application of rhetorical terms.

In my experience of working with actors, the better their grasp of
linguistic patterning, the more convincing their intonation  - whatever
accent they're speaking in. Ironically, it's actually an aid to
appearing to be natural.

Controversially perhaps, I think we would see a huge improvement in
Shakespearean performance if we jettisoned the more new-agey aspects of
current voice-work practice and started fostering a delight in the
playfulness of pattern instead.

Yours
Ros

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Anatole Fourmantchouk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 03 Dec 1998 12:43:56 -0500
Subject: 9.1226  Re: Rhetoric
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.1226  Re: Rhetoric

I completely agree - rhetoric as a background, sort of warming up. This
is a gap in actors training. Because , practicing on Sh. won't do any
good, but drying out live vibration of action. We do have to exercise
the way the Greeks did - and always distinguish the difference between
Epos, Melos and Drama. Actors should be accustomed to, so to speak, not
natural way of speaking which convey, as a result, natural feeling,
taking into account  that  conflict cannot be resolved only by
exchanging speeches. There is something else and there are two different
approaches -  from creator and  from spectator. There are a plenty
exercises ( I teach  a similar course at Michael Howard's), it takes
time and time and time - but I can't even describe the result . I did R
&J in England (two hours, full text, 100% resonance) but preparation
was... Oh!

Please, keep me posting.

Good Luck.

Anatole Fourmantchouk,
Art. Dir. The New York Art Theatre.
Prof. Circle In The Square Theatre School, Michael Howard Studios.

Re: Plagiarism

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.1233  Friday, 4 December 1998.

[1]     From:   Andrew Murphy <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 3 Dec 1998 12:06:32 +0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.1232  Re: Plagiarism

[2]     From:   Gabriel Egan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 3 Dec 1998 09:18:04 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.1232  Re: Plagiarism

[3]     From:   Penelope Rixon <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 3 Dec 1998 12:39:51 -0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.1232  Re: Plagiarism

[4]     From:   Kathleen Hannah <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 3 Dec 1998 14:03:28 CST6CDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.1232  Re: Plagiarism

[5]     From:   Leslie Fields <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 3 Dec 1998 12:26:27 -0900
        Subj:   Re: Fwd: SHK 9.1224  Plagiarism

[6]     From:   David H. Maruyama <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 3 Dec 1998 23:55:57 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.1232  Re: Plagiarism


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Andrew Murphy <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 3 Dec 1998 12:06:32 +0000
Subject: 9.1232  Re: Plagiarism
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.1232  Re: Plagiarism

I, too, was pretty amazed by the plagiarism posting. I've seen one or
two sites like this in the past, but most of them offer some sort of fig
leaf denial of their real intent (to sell essays for fraudulent
submission). The blatancy of this one is astonishing (as is the
site-owner's brass neck in seeking to have it advertised on the Globe
site!)

I wondered whether the academic community generally is taking any action
on these sites. I understand that there are complex issues of net
censorship involved. But even if these sites are not to be driven off
the net, shouldn't the academic community at least be filling up their
email inboxes with messages telling them how we feel about what they are
doing?

Cheers,
Andrew

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Gabriel Egan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 3 Dec 1998 09:18:04 -0500
Subject: 9.1232  Re: Plagiarism
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.1232  Re: Plagiarism

The essay-ordering service drawn to our attention by Chantal
Muller-Schutz doesn't deliver as rapidly as it claims. Yesterday I
ordered an essay on "Is Othello a racist play?", cash-on-delivery, and
am still waiting.

(I wouldn't get too worried about students using this service-just look
out for the character "Poolingbrooke" in Richard 2 and you'll know where
the essay came from.)

Gabriel Egan

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Penelope Rixon <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 3 Dec 1998 12:39:51 -0000
Subject: 9.1232  Re: Plagiarism
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.1232  Re: Plagiarism

Simon:

I agree with you, but I suppose this development is simply a logical
response to market forces in some people's book!  I doubt whether the
site is administered by a 'true academic' as you'd use the term,
though.  In fact, there are several of these wretched sites on the Net;
one of the down sides of the new medium.  My only hope is that most
students will be too honest to use them, and those who aren't will be
too poor, which is quite likely in this country.  Incidentally, it seems
to me that the existence of this kind of resource is a strong argument
for keeping conventional exams as a major part of assessment of academic
ability.

Penny

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Kathleen Hannah <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 3 Dec 1998 14:03:28 CST6CDT
Subject: 9.1232  Re: Plagiarism
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.1232  Re: Plagiarism

I don't think we're talking about "true academics," here, but
undergraduate students. Having just been through my semesterly battle
with plagiarists, I've been wondering whether there are any plans to
make a SHAXICON-like computer program that would allow teachers to
electronically compare students' in-class writing with their
out-of-class writing. I know it would probably not work 100%, but it
might back up some cases that go before plagiarism committees.  Anyone
heard of any such thing?

Katie Hannah

[5]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Leslie Fields <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 3 Dec 1998 12:26:27 -0900
Subject: SHK 9.1224  Plagiarism
Comment:        Re: Fwd: SHK 9.1224  Plagiarism

Mike,

What a philanthropist this hoodlum is!  How thoughtful of him to provide
essays at so reasonable a cost. Think of all the agony and ecstasy he is
saving student-consumers.  (This, of course, only reinforces education
as a commodity; students as consumers in a largely business transaction,
upon completion of which, they expect to earn larger salaries than had
they not purchased the sheepskin)

Thanks for the tip.   This is why I walk with my students through the
(all too) painful process of generating ideas, formulating outlines,
rough draft, etc., so by the time the paper is due,  I KNOW it has
sprung, been dragged, rather, from their own brain cells.

A cheery Thursday to you!

Leslie

[6]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David H. Maruyama <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 3 Dec 1998 23:55:57 EST
Subject: 9.1232  Re: Plagiarism
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.1232  Re: Plagiarism

Greetings:

Fortunately, I don't think I have seen a "purchased" essay submitted in
my comp classes (being a gypsy English teacher).  Of course, I could be
wrong.  The sale and distribution of essays is not something new.  I
remember an undergraduate (while I was an undergraduate) who purchased
their stuff for assignments in English Composition.  I thought this was
most idiotic.  I was willing to try to write an essay, versus pay
anyone.   I hated to pay for anything unnecessary; I needed the money to
pay for more Top Ramen.

A poor starving student is not likely to try it.  A rich student might,
because they can afford it.  My experience has been that the rich can
afford the rather high prices demanded.  80 dollars for an A paper was
the figure at the time (1991).  I wanted to eat, so I spent my time
typing in the lab.

Giving up an essay to these guys is giving them free money.  You do the
work; they get some more dollars.  Unfortunately, there is a market for
this stuff.  The more the market demands; the more you will see these
types of enterprises.  The internet is a convenient medium to increase
sales.  This web page might be real attractive to a freshman.

Nowadays, I don't think students look at a college education as an
education.  They look at the degree in terms of potential income
afterwards.  The idea behind the sale of essays is to make the process
easy.  Buy the degree.  The payback will be good anyways.  This is
sad.

d maruyama

Welles in Ann Arbor, Michigan

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.1231  Thursday, 3 December 1998.

From:           <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 03 Dec 1998 00:36:49 -0500
Subject:        Welles in Ann Arbor, Michigan

Those of you in the Ann Arbor area might be interested in the following
Shakespeare-related events happening at the Michigan Theater of Ann
Arbor (a restored movie palace).  I'm unconnected with the Theater,
other than making regular trips there to see often excellent and rarely
shown films.

On Sept. 5:
An Evening with Gary Graver, including Q&A and
   WORKING WITH ORSON WELLES (excerpts) and
    F FOR FAKE, 6:00 pm
    THE MERCHANT OF VENICE (15 min excerpt), FILMING OTHELLO, 9:00 pm
Throughout the evening, Gary Grave's 90 min documentary,
WORKING WITH ORSON WELLES, and which includes the trailer for
F for FAKE as well as interviews with other film directors
and critics) will be screened in its entirety on a monitor
in the Grand Foyer.

SUN, DEC 6
Orson Welles Weekend:
--- MYSTERIES & MAGIC (various shorts), 2:00 pm
Includes George Melies Silent Shorts, CITIZEN KANE trailer,
magic tricks from feature films, Japanese whiskey
commercials; THE FOUNTAIN OF YOUTH; an episode from Orson Welles'
GREAT MYSTERIES.
--- CHIMES AT MIDNIGHT, 4:00 pm

If anyone who goes to the Merchant/Othello showing on Saturday would be
so kind as to let me know what comments, if any, G. makes, I'd
appreciate it; I'm unable to attend.

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Re: Plagiarism

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.1232  Thursday, 3 December 1998.

From:           Simon Spiero <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 3 Dec 1998 09:59:45 -0800
Subject: 9.1224 Plagiarism
Comment:        RE: SHK 9.1224 Plagiarism

I must be very old-fashioned but I find this letter on plagiarism
unbelievable. How any true academic could use someone`s essay under his
own name and reply to such an offer is inconceivable to me. Chantal is
absolutely right to draw this to our attention and also to refuse.
Perhaps I am naive,
Yours Simon.

Don John

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.1230  Thursday, 3 December 1998.

From:           Laurence R. Baker <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 02 Dec 1998 22:11:13 -0500
Subject:        Re: Don John

We are told in Much Ado that Don John "has of late stood out against"
Don Pedro.  In a summary of the scene, the New Folger Library Edition
suggests that Don John was "defeated" by Don Pedro in the "just-ended
war."  I can't see any reason for supposing this.  Does anyone have a
suggestion as to the nature of their past quarrel?

Laurence R. Baker

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