1998

Re: Honan

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.1213  Tuesday, 1 December 1998.

From:           W. L. Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Mondayy, 30 Nov 1998 22:57:52 -0500
Subject: 9.1204  Re: Honan
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.1204  Re: Honan

Roy Flannagan  writes:

>I have been impressed with Honan's biography so far, for giving some
>sense of what a glover's son in Stratford might grow up to know about
>the bourgeoisie, trade with the Dutch, feminine apprentices, sheep,
>theft, petty-proud guildsmen, Ovid, poaching, wattle-and-daub,
>recusancy, money worries, family loyalty, illegitimate children.

I fully agree, but I want to bring up (as Honan does on page 83) the
fact that the consistory court's license entry has William "Shaxpere"
marrying "Annam whateley de Temple grafton."

Earlier Honan suggests that "hate away" in Sonnet 145 is a reference to
Hathaway, and notes that Anne is sometimes called Agnes, pronounced
Annes (74).

In any case, in the sixteenth century, names seem to have been spelled
(vaguely) phonetically (e.g., Morley for Marlowe). Is there any chance
that Whateley is a variant of Hathaway? It sounds (as my students say)
like a stretch, but I'm wondering if Whately could have been pronounced
Hateley which might be close enough to Hate-away for a sixteenth century
clerk.

Yours, Bill Godshalk

Call for Papers

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.1212  Tuesday, 1 December 1998.

From:           Susan C. Oldrieve <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 30 Nov 1998 21:18:31 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Call for Papers

SECOND CALL FOR PAPERS
"Shakespeare in the New Millennium"

The Ohio Shakespeare Conference
Cleveland, Ohio
March 18, 19, 20, 1999
Sponsored this year by Baldwin-Wallace College

Plenary addresses by Michael Bristol (author of Carnival and Theater and
Big Time Shakespeare),  James Bundy (artistic director, Great Lakes
Theater Festival), and Michael Mullin (Cybershakespeare project)

Topics will include pedagogy, performance, technology, the future of
Shakespeare studies, theory, and diversity issues.   Both experienced
and new scholars are encouraged to submit either abstracts or completed
essays.

We are also issuing a special invitation to UNDERGRADUATES to submit
papers for two undergraduate sessions.  Undergraduate papers may address
any of the topics listed above or examine one of Shakespeare's works
from the perspective of future audiences.  All undergraduate submissions
must be completed essays and must be accompanied by a letter of
recommendation from a supervising instructor.

All submissions must be received by January 5, 1999.

Registration fee is $45 for faculty, $25 for students, and includes
dinner Thursday and lunch on Friday.  Accommodations are at The Embassy
Suites in downtown Cleveland, close to Playhouse Square ($109 per night
plus tax.) Registration materials include information about less costly
hotels. Pre-registration deadline is February 15, 1999.

Send submissions and requests for registration information to

                        Professor Susan Oldrieve
                        Department of English
                        Baldwin-Wallace College
                        Berea, Ohio  44017
                        Phone:  440-826-2291
                        Fax:    440-892-1994
                        Email:  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Importance of GRE

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.1210  Tuesday, 1 December 1998.

From:           Jeffrey Myers <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 30 Nov 1998 09:31:26 -0500
Subject: 9.1205  Importance of GRE
Comment:        RE: SHK 9.1205  Importance of GRE

As an advisor for many English majors in a small liberal arts college, I
would also be interested in any responses to Bob Evans' question about
the relative weight of the GRE in admission to graduate school .

Thanks,
Jeff Myers

LLL and the Heptameron

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.1211  Tuesday, 1 December 1998.

From:           Jerry Carlson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 30 Nov 1998 12:15:25 -0700
Subject:        LLL and the Heptameron

Before I try researching this myself, has anyone written on possible
relationships between LLL and the Heptameron?  The latter is a
collection of short stories told and commented upon by characters
modelled on King Henry of Navarre, his wife Marguerite (who had been
Princess of France), and members of their court.

TIA

Shakespeare and Popular Music

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.1209  Tuesday, 1 December 1998.

From:           Emma French <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 30 Nov 1998 05:29:33 PST
Subject:        Shakespeare and Popular Music

There is a new song by US band Semisonic called "Singing in my Sleep"
that features the lines "Singing up to a Capulet/ On a balcony in your
mind". I am trying to collect all such references to Shakespeare in pop
music-there are plenty of them and I would appreciate the list's input.

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