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Home :: Archive :: 1998 :: November ::
Re: Rickmansworth; Isabella; Lion King; Sonnets
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.1086  Wednesday, 4 November 1998.

[1]     From:   Sean Lawrence <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 03 Nov 1998 07:26:40 -0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.1081  Re: Gertrude

[2]     From:   W. L. Godshalk <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 03 Nov 1998 17:25:36 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.1079  Re: Isabella

[3]     From:   Mason West <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 04 Nov 1998 00:33:23 -0600
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.1078  Re: Lion King 2

[4]     From:   Karen E Peterson-Kranz <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 4 Nov 1998 11:05:39 +1000 (GMT+1000)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.1043  Teaching the Sonnets


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean Lawrence <
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Date:           Tuesday, 03 Nov 1998 07:26:40 -0800
Subject: 9.1081  Re: Gertrude
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.1081  Re: Gertrude

Terry writes:

> understand Gertrude. Mind you, I once passed through Rickmansworth and
> felt that I had got to the bottom of King Lear. It didn't last.

Was that when you decided it was all about unemployment?

Cheers,
Sean.

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W. L. Godshalk <
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Date:           Tuesday, 03 Nov 1998 17:25:36 -0500
Subject: 9.1079  Re: Isabella
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.1079  Re: Isabella

Ed Taft writes:

>Isn't the preferred state in this play married love, which
>if faithful, is a kind of chastity?  The reason has to do with Isabella,
>I think. Her gifts are not well used in the cloister, but they will be
>as helpmate to the Duke. I'm thinking in particular of her rhetorical
>gifts, which, arguably, she possesses more of than any other character
>in the play.

Well, I think monogamous married love is chaste, if we define chastity
as sexual exclusivity. Chastity is not virginity. True virginity is no
sex at all. That seems to be what Isabella wants, none at all.

If marriage is the preferred state in <italic>Measure for
Measure</italic>, I'd still hate to be married to Angelo (were I
Mariana, of course), because Angelo is too prenzy for my tastes. In
contrast, Lucio isn't likely to be a very monogamous husband. Not much
chance for love in one marriage, or for chastity in the other.

And, of course, does Isabella take the Duke's offer?  If she has a way
with words, she certainly doesn't use any to accept Vincentio's offer.
If she'd rather that her brother die than she have intercourse with a
man, I doubt if she's going to jump into bed with the questionable duke
of dark corners who has for fourteen years allowed his people too much
scope (or so he tells Friar Thomas). After all, until the last scene of
the play, she thinks he's a priest. Now he offers something further.

As to Dave Evett's question about the bushes, I chastely decline to
answer.

Yours, Bill Godshalk

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Mason West <
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Date:           Wednesday, 04 Nov 1998 00:33:23 -0600
Subject: 9.1078  Re: Lion King 2
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.1078  Re: Lion King 2

Jason Mical of Drury College wrote: "I mentioned the connection between
the first Lion King and _Hamlet_ to a colleague and we both agreed that
the story more closely resemblesb _Richard III_, told from Richmond's
perspective (Richmond being Simba). _H_ is a possibility, but _R III_ is
more likely. "

I always suspected that the original _Lion King_ contains more than a
touch of Henry IV-is it part 2 when Prince Hal is off cavorting in the
public houses with his friends? The lion prince's dalliances seem to
parallel Hal's.

-- Mason West

[4]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Karen E Peterson-Kranz <
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Date:           Wednesday, 4 Nov 1998 11:05:39 +1000 (GMT+1000)
Subject: 9.1043  Teaching the Sonnets
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.1043  Teaching the Sonnets

Dear Don-I have used Maya Angelou's *I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings* as
an entrance point.  Angelou describes Shakespeare as her "first white
love" because he wrote "When in disgrace with fortune and men's eyes..."
I've asked students what a 10-year old black girl in 1930s Arkansas
would get out of the sonnet?  It seems to work, although I personally am
uncomfortable with asserting "universal meaningfulness" for any
literature.  I've also had classes read the sonnets out loud to each
other -- usually breaking up into groups or dyads works best for this,
then having them report on how different people's readings communicated
different effects.  You can get some interesting conversations going on
Sonnets 1-17 by asking them, "why is one man trying to persuade another
man, in the apparent absence of any potential spousal unit, to
reproduce?  What's going on here?"  This can lead to discussing
historical context.  Last but not least, just reading the sonnets out
loud, myself, to the students has been almost a necessity, to show how
the poems scan and how they might sound/mean.

Good luck! -- Karen Peterson-Kranz
 

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