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Home :: Archive :: 1998 :: November ::
Re: Pericles
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.1175  Thursday, 19 November 1998.

[1]     From:   Carl Fortunato <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 18 Nov 1998 09:39:05 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.1164  Pericles

[2]     From:   Robert Neblett <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 18 Nov 1998 11:14:00 -0600
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.1164  Pericles


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Carl Fortunato <
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Date:           Wednesday, 18 Nov 1998 09:39:05 EST
Subject: 9.1164  Pericles
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.1164  Pericles

I wasn't even aware that it was playing.  Where is it?  It's a bit late
in the year for the Delacorte Theatre?

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Robert Neblett <
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Date:           Wednesday, 18 Nov 1998 11:14:00 -0600
Subject: 9.1164  Pericles
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.1164  Pericles

I for one would be very interested in hearing about this production.
Until recently, when directors with a sense of adventure and vision
approached such "bad" works as TITUS (see Julie Taymor), plays like
PERICLES have been relegated to the world of "bad" Shakespeare, which of
course means it is "doubtful" Shakespeare, because the Bard is an
infallible writer, as we all know, and cannot have written a bad play.
I read PERICLES as a sophomore in college and fell in love with it
because of its inventiveness and sense of play.  It's a great story.
And it's (in many ways) virtually unstageable, which is a challenge I
love to see directors and actors tackle any time.  I think that PERICLES
deserves a little more attention as a text rather than as an "oddity";
in other words, I would challenge critics to look at it through the same
lens they do HAMLET, say, rather than focusing on the subject of its
legitimacy in the Shakespeare canon.  The main argument I have seen for
its exclusion is that it does not conform to the typical structure of a
Shakespeare play.  Why can't we suppose that Shakespeare was
experimenting with style and structure instead?  Why can't we
assume/accept that he was not as stodgy a personality as many of the
professors who teach him to our youth (if he is being taught at all).
 

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