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Home :: Archive :: 1998 :: November ::
Re: Branagh
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.1199  Saturday, 28 November 1998.

[1]     From:   Carl Fortunato <
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        Date:   Friday, 27 Nov 1998 10:20:54 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.1189 Re: Branagh

[2]     From:   Barbara R. Hume <
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        Date:   Friday, 27 Nov 1998 18:57:00 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.1189 Re: Branagh


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Carl Fortunato <
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Date:           Friday, 27 Nov 1998 10:20:54 EST
Subject: 9.1189 Re: Branagh
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.1189 Re: Branagh

>  >Am I the only one who thought Branagh stole the panning shot of Hamlet
>  >just before the intermission from Scarlett O'Hara's "I'll never be
>  >hungry again" soliloquy.
>  >
>  >Obviously I'm doing anything to keep from grading papers.
>
>  I'm willing to grant that it was an unconscious, but unfortunate,
>  imitation. We saw it on video at our house, and it cracked up my
>  (admittedly easily crackupable) family.

I don't see how it COULD be unconscious.  I think it's been noticed by
every single person who's ever seen the movie.  What point Branagh could
be trying to make with it, I don't know, but how could he not have
noticed?

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Barbara R. Hume <
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Date:           Friday, 27 Nov 1998 18:57:00 -0700
Subject: 9.1189 Re: Branagh
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.1189 Re: Branagh

>In my opinion, Claudius's usurpation of the throne would have been even
>more dramatically illustrated had Claudius worn the crown. It would also
>have made more dramatic, historical and psychological sense. It is hard
>to believe that someone as ambitious as Claudius would have resisted the
>temptation to wear the crown. It is even harder to understand how he
>could have refused to wear the crown on official occasions, when, I
>assume, even the most legitimate of monarchs was called upon to wear it
>along with the other trappings of his office.
>
>What do others think?
>
>Benjamin

Perhaps he had heard that uneasy lies the head that wears the crown.

Barbara Hume
 

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