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Home :: Archive :: 1998 :: November ::
Re: Honan; Presentism; Sheep
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.1204  Monday, 30 November 1998.

[1]     From:   Roy Flannagan <
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        Date:   Saturday, 28 Nov 1998 09:34:59 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.1200 Re: Honan

[2]     From:   John Drakakis <
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        Date:   Sunday, 29 Nov 1998 14:03:49 -0000
        Subj:   RE: SHK 9.1202 Re: Presentism

[3]     From:   Peter Groves <
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        Date:   Monday, 30 Nov 1998 10:08:12 +1100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.1195 Re: Sheep


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Roy Flannagan <
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Date:           Saturday, 28 Nov 1998 09:34:59 -0500
Subject: 9.1200 Re: Honan
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.1200 Re: Honan

I have been impressed with Honan's biography so far, for giving some
sense of what a glover's son in Stratford might grow up to know about
the bourgeoisie, trade with the Dutch, feminine apprentices, sheep,
theft, petty-proud guildsmen, Ovid, poaching, wattle-and-daub,
recusancy, money worries, family loyalty, illegitimate children.  Though
I talked with Park Honan several years ago about various computer
studies of Shakespeare (including one I had done with an honors student
that analysed the 1593 quarto of RIII in terms of the frequency of words
having to do with gender, emotion, and the senses), he seemed interested
but certainly not obsessed with what computers might uncover about
acting roles or authorship.

If the biography is published in a paper version, I would be happy to
assign it in a tragedies, histories, or comedies course.

Roy Flannagan

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Drakakis <
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Date:           Sunday, 29 Nov 1998 14:03:49 -0000
Subject: 9.1202 Re: Presentism
Comment:        RE: SHK 9.1202 Re: Presentism

You've been at the zinfandel again Bill,

I think that Terry's proposition is really very straightforward one. How
can you look at the past from ANY position save that of the present? All
narratives of the past are from the position of the present- how can
they be otherwise?  That's the point that Stephen Greenblatt makes in
the introductory chapter of Shakespearean Negotiations.  That's not the
answer to the problem of course, but it does stop us from seeking refuge
in lazy, glib, and frankly, knee-jerk, moralizing.

Cheers,
John Drakakis

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Peter Groves <
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Date:           Monday, 30 Nov 1998 10:08:12 +1100
Subject: 9.1195 Re: Sheep
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.1195 Re: Sheep

> > With regard to the proceeds to be derived from sheep, a small
> > qualification may be in order. I have been told that in the past sheep
> > (like people) were a lot smaller than they are now. At least, this was
> > the case in the eighteenth century, and it is hardly likely that they
> > shrunk after say 1600, to start growing again between 1800 and now. The
> > size of sheep would, I imagine, also affect the amount of wool they
> > produce, and definitely the amount of meat. Unfortunately, I only have
> > this information from hearsay, so I cannot refer the list to any
> > quotable sources.

I'm afraid I don't have a source either, but I'd always understood the
modern larger sheep to be a result of C18 selective breeding, part to
the Agricultural Revolution.

Peter Groves,
Department of English,
Monash University,
Melbourne
 

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