1998

Re: Maps of Play Settings

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.1106  Monday, 9 November 1998.

[1]     From:   Wes Folkerth <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Sunday, 08 Nov 1998 11:41:27 -0500
        Subj:   Re: Maps of Play Settings

[2]     From:   Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Sunday, 08 Nov 1998 13:03:54 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.1105 Maps of play settings?

[3]     From:   Terence Hawkes <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 9 Nov 1998 02:37:47 -0500
        Subj:   SHK 9.1105 Maps of play settings?


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Wes Folkerth <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 08 Nov 1998 11:41:27 -0500
Subject:        Re: Maps of Play Settings

There are probably better sources than the following, but I can
tentatively suggest Isaac Asimov's Guide to Shakespeare (New York:
Avenel, 1979 -- reprint).  Each chapter on a specific play includes a
map of the region in which it takes place.

Wes Folkerth
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 08 Nov 1998 13:03:54 -0500
Subject: 9.1105 Maps of play settings?
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.1105 Maps of play settings?

Ray Lischner. co-author of the planned "Shakespeare for Dummies,"
wrote:

> I want to find a modern map that shows the settings for Shakespeare's
> plays (perhaps two maps: one of Europe and the Mediterranean and another
> showing more details of England and France). So far, I haven't found
> anything I like. Can anyone recommend a good source for such a map or
> maps? Thank you.

Isaac Asimov, in his two volume "Guide to Shakespeare" (Doubleday 1979),
prefaces the discussion of each play with a clear map showing the play's
loci, and a discussion of any difficulties in this regard.  The maps are
quite good, but, of course, the work in still in copyright. While I
doubt that Isaac would have called his book "Shakespeare for Dummies,"
it has a similar popularizing and simplifying purpose.

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Terence Hawkes <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 9 Nov 1998 02:37:47 -0500
Subject: Maps of play settings?
Comment:        SHK 9.1105 Maps of play settings?

Dear Ray Lischner:

You need a map of Britain, not England.

T. Hawkes

Maps of play settings?

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.1105  Sunday, 8 November 1998.

From:           Ray Lischner <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 06 Nov 1998 20:50:53 GMT
Subject:        Maps of play settings?

I want to find a modern map that shows the settings for Shakespeare's
plays (perhaps two maps: one of Europe and the Mediterranean and another
showing more details of England and France). So far, I haven't found
anything I like. Can anyone recommend a good source for such a map or
maps? Thank you.

Ray Lischner, co-author (with John Doyle) of forthcoming Shakespeare for
Dummies

New Branagh Flick

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.1103  Sunday, 8 November 1998.

From:           Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 06 Nov 1998 11:13:44 -0800
Subject:        New Branagh Flick.

Hi, guys.

This may not directly concern Shakespeare, but I flipped on the TV while
making dinner last night and the channel happened to be showing
Entertainment Tonight.  Not wanting something that would really distract
me from deglazing, I left it on.

It turns out that Kenneth Branagh is starring in a new Woody Allen film
called _Celebrity_.  It really seems quite good-not only is Branagh
letting someone else direct him in a somewhat self-effacing role, he's
also making a reflection on celebrity itself.  Good for him, and, IMHO,
a welcome change.

Cheers,
Sean.

Re: Shakespeare's Edward III

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.1104  Sunday, 8 November 1998.

From:           W. L. Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 06 Nov 1998 11:35:28 -0500
Subject: 9.1095  Re: Shakespeare's Edward III
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.1095  Re: Shakespeare's Edward III

I would like to add a selected reading list to the discussion of E3:

Armstrong, R. L., ed. Edward III, in E. B. Everitt and R. L. Armstrong,
ed. Six Early Plays Related to the Shakespeare Canon. Copenhagen:
Rosenkilde and Bagger, 1965.195-250.

Evans, G. Blakemore and J. J. M. Tobin, eds. The Riverside Shakespeare.
2nd Edition. Boston: Hougton Mifflin, 1997.

Godshalk, W. L. "Dating Edward III," Notes and Queries 42 (1995):
299-300

Koskenniemi, Inna. "Themes and Imagery in Edward III," Neuphilologische
Mittielungen 65 (1964): 446-80.

Lapides, Fred, ed. The Raigne of King Edward the Third: A Critical,
Old-Spelling Edition. Renaissance Drama, A Collection of Critical
Editions. New York: Garland, 1980.

Melchiori, Giorgio, ed. Kind Edward III. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1998.

Muir, Kenneth. The Sources of Shakespeare's Plays. London: Methuen,
1977.

_____. Shakespeare as Collaborator. New York: Barnes & Noble, 1960.
10-55.

Pearlman, E. "Edward III and Henry V," Criticism 37 (1995): 519-536.

Proudfoot, Richard. "The Reign of King Edward the Third (1596) and
Shakespeare," Proceedings of the British Academy 71 (1985):169-85.

Sams, Eric, ed. Shakespeare's Edward III. New Haven: Yale UP, 1996.

Slater, Eliot. The Problem of The Reign of King Edward III: A
Statistical Approach. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1988. (This volume
contains the findings of the much-alluded-to computer analysis of the
play.)

Wells, Stanley, Gary Taylor, et al. William Shakespeare: A Textual
Companion. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1987. 136-137: "if we had attempted
a thorough reinvestigation of candidates for inclusion in the early
dramatic canon, it would have begun with <italic>Edward III</italic>."

Wentersdorf, Karl.  The Authorship of  Edward III. Ph.D. Dissertation,
University of Cincinnati, 1960.

______. "The Date of Edward III," Shakespeare Quarterly 16 (1965):
227-31.

Why do I post a basic reading list? Because it seems that the discussion
of E3 could do with some solid background.  The claim that Shakespeare
possibly or probably had a hand in the play is not new news; note that
Wentersdorf and Muir in the early 60s had already put forth
Shakespeare's claim. Muir's theory is that E3 is Shakespeare's revision
of an earlier play. Wentersdorf shows that the imagery of E3 is
Shakespearean in nature.

Eliot Slater (guided by Richard Proudfoot) did the computer analysis of
the play. Proudfoot told me some years ago that Slater was not entirely
satisfied with his analysis. He had wanted to prove conclusively that
Shakespeare wrote E3, but all he could do was link the play to certain
early plays by Shakespeare. But if you don't like Slater's findings, it
seems to me that you have to read his book and then point out where he
went wrong.

Yours, Bill Godshalk

Veteran's Day

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.1102  Sunday, 8 November 1998.

From:           Carol Barton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Date:           Friday, 6 Nov 1998 10:36:55 EST
Subject:        Veteran's Day

For those of you who are soldiers, were soldiers, or are the sons and
daughters of people who served . . . please take a minute next Wednesday
to read this over as an expression of the gratitude of the rest of us,
or to give this to someone to whom it is due.

Happy Veteran's Day, all!

(No apologies for cross-posting.)

Carol Barton
Dept. of English
Averett College

 WHAT IS A VETERAN??

Some veterans bear visible signs of their service: a missing limb, a
jagged scar, a certain look in the eye. Others may carry the evidence
inside them:

a pin holding a bone together, a piece of shrapnel in the leg - or
perhaps another sort of inner steel: the soul's ally forged in the
refinery of adversity.  Except in parades, however, the men and women
who have kept America safe wear no badge or emblem. You can't tell a vet
just by looking.

What is a vet?

He is the cop on the beat who spent six months in Saudi Arabia sweating
two gallons a day making sure the armored personnel carriers didn't run
out of fuel.

He is the barroom loudmouth, dumber than five wooden planks, whose
overgrown frat-boy behavior is outweighed a hundred times in the cosmic
scales by four hours of exquisite bravery near the 38th parallel.

She - or he - is the nurse who fought against futility and went to sleep
sobbing every night for two solid years in Da Nang.

He is the POW who went away one person and came back another - or didn't
come back AT ALL.

He is the Quantico drill instructor who has never seen combat - but has
saved countless lives by turning slouchy, no-account rednecks and gang
members into Marines, and teaching them to watch each other's backs.

He is the parade-riding Legionnaire who pins on his ribbons and medal
with a prosthetic hand.

He is the career quartermaster who watches the ribbons and medals pass
him by.

He is the three anonymous heroes in The Tomb Of The Unknowns, whose
presence at the Arlington National Cemetery must forever preserve the
memory of all the anonymous heroes whose valor dies unrecognized with
them on the battlefield or in the ocean's sunless deep.

He is the old guy bagging groceries at the supermarket - palsied now and
aggravatingly slow - who helped liberate a Nazi death camp and who
wishes all day long that his wife were still alive to hold him when the
nightmares come.

He is an ordinary and yet an extraordinary human being - a person who
offered some of his life's most vital years in the service of his
country, and who sacrificed his ambitions so others would not have to
sacrifice theirs. He is a soldier and a savior and a sword against the
darkness, and he is nothing more than the finest, greatest testimony on
behalf of the finest, greatest nation ever known.

So remember, each time you see someone who has served our country, just
lean over and say Thank You. That's all most people need, and in most
cases it will mean more than any medals they could have been awarded or
were awarded.

Two little words that mean a lot, "THANK YOU".

Remember November 11th is Veterans Day

"It is the soldier, not the reporter,

Who has given us freedom of the press.

It is the soldier, not the poet,

Who has given us freedom of speech.

It is the soldier, not the campus organizer,

Who has given us the freedom to demonstrate.

It is the soldier,

Who salutes the flag,

Who serves beneath the flag,

And whose coffin is draped by the flag,

Who allows the protestor to burn the flag."

* Father Denis Edward O'Brien, USMC

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