1998

Re: Henry V's Answer to Williams

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.1165  Wednesday, 18 November 1998.

[1]     From:   Richard Bovard <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 17 Nov 1998 10:30:39 -0600
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.1156  Re: Henry V's Answer to Williams

[2]     From:   Clifford Stetner <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 18 Nov 1998 02:07:06 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.1156  Re: Henry V's Answer to Williams


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard Bovard <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 17 Nov 1998 10:30:39 -0600
Subject: 9.1156  Re: Henry V's Answer to Williams
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.1156  Re: Henry V's Answer to Williams

If absolution and contrition are possible, then, perhaps Williams is
asking about the pain and suffering of those who die?  His emphasis on
all those severed limbs, those body parts, is consistent with the
metaphor of mangling that runs through the play.  And who has mangled
Peace in France?

Richard Bovard
North Dakota State University

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Clifford Stetner <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 18 Nov 1998 02:07:06 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 9.1156  Re: Henry V's Answer to Williams
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.1156  Re: Henry V's Answer to Williams

But while the England of Henry V was a Catholic country that was more or
less secure in its religious beliefs, that acknowledged a belief in
purgatory and was confident of ultimate salvation, the England of
Shakespeare was being led by its sovereign into new religious forms.  If
the schism with the church be a cause not good, then, like Henry V, the
Tudor sovereigns might have a great many souls to answer for come
judgment day.

> I don't know the historical facts about Henry's campaign, but surely
> most such expeditions included members of the clergy, and most of the
> soldiers took the opportunity on the night before the battle to make a
> final confession. This would have been the equivalent of the death-bed
> repentance available to others. In Catholic tradition, a sincere act of
> contrition, even without a priest's absolution, is sufficient to "clear
> the record" before death.
>
> Chris Gordon

Pericles

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.1164  Wednesday, 18 November 1998.

From:           Stanley Wells <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 17 Nov 1998 15:43:57 +0000
Subject:        Pericles

I saw a preview of Pericles at the Public Theatre in New York three
weeks ago and have been surprised not to see it mentioned on the list -
though I may have missed references to it. It's an inventive, sensitive,
and deeply moving production which I highly recommend, especially to
those contributors who referred to it as a bad play.

Stanley Wells

Re: SHAKSPOP; Pop Music

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.1162  Wednesday, 18 November 1998.

[1]     From:   Emma French <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 17 Nov 1998 06:45:15 PST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.1159 Re: SHAKSPOP

[2]     From:   Kristen McDermott <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 17 Nov 1998 13:01:39 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.1159  Re: SHAKSPOP

[3]     From:   Annalisa Castaldo <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 18 Nov 1998 08:08:31 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.1159 Re: SHAKSPOP

[4]     From:   Marilyn Bonomi <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 17 Nov 1998 18:03:22 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.1149  Pop Music


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Emma French <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 17 Nov 1998 06:45:15 PST
Subject: 9.1159 Re: SHAKSPOP
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.1159 Re: SHAKSPOP

There was a British TV series a few years ago called "The Darling Buds
of May." It starred Catherine Zeta Jones who is obviously big news in
the States now. I think it was based on a book of the same name, but
clearly the title was originally lifted from a well-known sonnet, and
presumably a large proportion of its audience would have been aware of
the reference.

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Kristen McDermott <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 17 Nov 1998 13:01:39 -0500
Subject: 9.1159  Re: SHAKSPOP
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.1159  Re: SHAKSPOP

To Karen Pirnie:

Try the relatively new play (actually a collection of short pieces)
called "Love's Fire" --- playlets by some prominent contemporary
playwrights (Wendy Wasserstein, John Guare, etc.) based on selected
sonnets.  Most of the plays are unfunny and overwrought but the last
one, in which a self-conscious troupe of young actors discusses the
sonnets and the play they are rehearsing, is witty and fun.  "Love's
Fire" was recently published in paperback-you can get it through
Amazon.com.

Kristen Mcdermott
Spelman College

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Annalisa Castaldo <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 18 Nov 1998 08:08:31 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 9.1159 Re: SHAKSPOP
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.1159 Re: SHAKSPOP

I'm sure many people will mention this, but in the movie "Clueless" Cher
writes a love note using lines from "Shall I compare thee to a summer's
day?" She identifies it as "a famous quote" by "Cliffnotes."

Annalisa Castaldo
Temple University

[4]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Marilyn Bonomi <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 17 Nov 1998 18:03:22 -0500
Subject: 9.1149  Pop Music
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.1149  Pop Music

A female teenage hip-hop duo from Denmark calling themselves S.O.A.P.
has just issued a US release containing among other things a song called
"Romeo and Juliet."

I've not (TRUST ME!) listened to the CD; it arrived with a box of
cassingles of their big Danish hit and a letter asking to have the HS
newspaper I advise do a review and distribute the cassingles.  I don't
think we'll bother....

Marilyn Bonomi

Re: Shrews Behaving Badly

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.1163  Wednesday, 18 November 1998.

From:           Chris J. Fassler <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 17 Nov 1998 11:13:41 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Shrews Behaving Badly

Colleagues:

Earlier, more timely responses gave Jerry Adair's post the welcome it
deserved.  Let me add that the presumption of "we men" in his last
paragraph is monumentally absurd.

Thank you, Jean Peterson, for representing many of us so well in this
discussion.

Cordially,
--Chris Fassler

Re: WT and Sheep

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.1161  Wednesday, 18 November 1998.

[1]     From:   Roy Flannagan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 17 Nov 1998 09:32:03 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.1152  WT and Sheep

[2]     From:   Nora Kreimer <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 17 Nov 1998 21:23:13 -0300
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.1152  WT and Sheep


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Roy Flannagan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 17 Nov 1998 09:32:03 -0500
Subject: 9.1152  WT and Sheep
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.1152  WT and Sheep

I answer this as a one-time sheep farmer.  The wool from sheering 1500
sheep, then and now, would make a large chunk of income, possibly about
$5000 in today's U.S. currency.  1500 sheep would be an enormous herd
for one person to manage, then or now, and it would require the
full-time services of at least two shepherds, probably on shifts, with a
nightmare at lambing time.  The Clown, if he isn't lying, would be a
wealthy farmer.  The mature lamb, after sheering, would be worth as much
as about forty pounds of lamb (the meat) would be worth, possibly $100 -
120 for today's shepherd.

British shepherds might have a better market for wool or for meat, but
farmers I have talked to locally in southeastern Ohio, still say "Sheep
pays you twice," once at sheering time and once at slaughter.

Roy Flannagan

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Nora Kreimer <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 17 Nov 1998 21:23:13 -0300
Subject: 9.1152  WT and Sheep
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.1152  WT and Sheep

I have found the Pastons' letters useful on the subject of prices in the
15th century. Also, perhaps you might try Fernand Braudel in
CIVILIZATION & CAPITALISM -15TH -18TH CENTURY, 1979.Harper & Row,
Puvblishers, New York (3 vols).

Try hard! You might get a cheaper price for your sheep!

Regards
Nora Kreimer
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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