1998

Q: Theatre Reference

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.1075  Saturday, 31 October 1998.

From:           Tom Reedy <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Fri, 30 Oct 1998 11:22:16 -0600
Subject:        Q: Theatre reference

In chapter 4 of her book, _Shakespeare Without Tears_, Margaret Webster
writes:

   . . . besides being an actor, a stage manager, and a business
partner    in his own theater he was also to a great extent the director
of his
   own plays.  A contemporary traveler from Germany relates that in
the    English theater "even the actors have to allow themselves to be
   instructed by the dramatist."

Since the book is written for the popular audience, she gives no
references.  Does anyone know the source of her quote?

Tom Reedy
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Various Responses

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.1074  Saturday, 31 October 1998.

[1]     From:   Sarah Hatchuel <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 29 Oct 1998 14:11:49 +0100
        Subj:   Branagh's Twelfth Night

[2]     From:   Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 29 Oct 1998 09:27:09 -0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.1061  Re: Lear

[3]     From:   John Owen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thu, 29 Oct 1998 21:51:23 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.1055 Elizabeth / Charlton Heston

[4]     From:   Lysbeth Benkert-Rasmussen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 30 Oct 98 15:13:00 CST
        Subj:   RE: SHK 9.1006  Re: Evil Women

[5]     From:   Richard A. Burt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 29 Oct 1998 11:12:30 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   The Lion King II

[6]     From:   Frances K. Barasch <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thu, 29 Oct 1998 19:25:17 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.1044 Re: Puppet Query

[7]     From:   Peter T. Hadorn <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thu, 29 Oct 1998 11:46:14 -0600
        Subj:   RE: SHK 9.1058 Re: Teaching the Sonnets


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sarah Hatchuel <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 29 Oct 1998 14:11:49 +0100
Subject:        Branagh's Twelfth Night

Judy Lewis wrote:

>According to my copy, Twelfth Night was produced by Branagh but
>directed by Paul Kafno.

Twelfth Night was directed by Kenneth Branagh for the Renaissance
Theatre Company in 1987. The play was so successful that it was filmed
for TV in 1988. The TV director was indeed Paul Kafno, but what he did
was just to choose the camera angles and cuts. When you buy the video of
a play, you must not forget to make the difference between the director
of the play and the TV director-who only comes after the "real"
directing job.

Sarah Hatchuel
University of Rouen, France

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 29 Oct 1998 09:27:09 -0800
Subject: 9.1061  Re: Lear
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.1061  Re: Lear

I wrote:

> Basically, I'd say that there's a difference between whether something
> is good and whether it's conceivable at all.  There are any number of
> Shakespearean kings whose rule is held for them.  This sort of rule by
> proxy is usually dire in its results, but nobody seemed to have
> conceiving of it.

My apologies to anyone who tried to understand this message.  The last
sentence should read, in part, "nobody seemed to have difficulty
conceiving of it."

Apologetically,
Sean.

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Owen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thu, 29 Oct 1998 21:51:23 EST
Subject: 9.1055 Elizabeth / Charlton Heston
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.1055 Elizabeth / Charlton Heston

I believe you are referring to a Hallmark Hall of Fame production of
Maxwell Anderson's Elizabeth and Essex, starring Judith Anderson as
Queen Bess and Heston as Essex. George Schaffer directed. The Hallmark
series was very briefly released a while back and seems to have
completely disappeared. A pity, because there is some interesting stuff
there.

Now, I would like someone to answer this question. In and around 1960,
Schaeffer turned his Hallmark production of the Evans/Anderson Macbeth
into a feature film. Older editions of Halliwell's film guide show it,
but the Internet Movie Database entry is horribly inaccurate. Evans was
not a great Macbeth, but Anderson was marvelous in the TV version. In
the film version, a high-powered supporting cast was acquired - Ian
Bannen as Macduff, Michael Hordern as Banquo, Jeremy Brett as
Malcolm-and I think the film is probably worth seeing for their sake.
Has anyone seen this mysterious film, which seems to have completely
disappeared? And does anyone know if it has been shown on TV recently or
appeared on Video?

John Owen
Campbell, CA

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Lysbeth Benkert-Rasmussen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 30 Oct 98 15:13:00 CST
Subject: 9.1006  Re: Evil Women
Comment:        RE: SHK 9.1006  Re: Evil Women

This is a bit belated, but if we could for a few minutes go back to
Gertrude.

Although I can't say that Gertrude has always made a great deal of sense
to me, I don't think that could ever say that I saw her as evil.  Now
that I have been living in the mid-west for a few years, I think I have
come to an understanding of Gertrude that I didn't have before.

1.  Illustrated clearly by Polonius's treatment of Ophelia, the culture
portrayed by the play is one in which women are seen as property-she is
her father's bargaining chip while she lives in his house; she becomes
her husband's property after marriage, and once he dies, well, if she
has a jointure great, if not she' out of luck and on her own.  Gertrude
is a woman who has suddenly been cut off from the only social/economic
protection available to her-her husband.  What is a queen supposed to do
in a strictly patriarchal society when her husband dies?  Well, what did
Katherine Parr do-she re-married as fast as she could.

2.  Once she has re-married, Gertrude appears to have the impulse to do
what so many women (especially women in the upper mid-west from what
I've seen so far) to "make nice."  She has made compromises in her life
and now she can't see why her son can't do the same thing and just be
nice.  The very first words she speaks in the play are caluculated to
smooth over a coming confrontation that she foresees and is trying
desperately to aviod.  She just wants him to pretend he's happy, but
especially, not to fight in front of the company.

[5]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard A. Burt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 29 Oct 1998 11:12:30 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        The Lion King II

There's an article on The Lion King II in the current issue of TV Guide
by Stephen Rea that also notes the R and J connection, as well as the
Hamlet Lion King connection.

R

[6]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Frances K. Barasch <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thu, 29 Oct 1998 19:25:17 EST
Subject: 9.1044 Re: Puppet Query
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.1044 Re: Puppet Query

To Andy White: thanks for suggestion on Czech puppetry; can you
recommend any publications on the subject?

To John Dwyer: thanks for the Speaight reference.

All and more advice will be appreciated.

Frances K. Barasch

[7]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Peter T. Hadorn <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thu, 29 Oct 1998 11:46:14 -0600
Subject: 9.1058 Re: Teaching the Sonnets
Comment:        RE: SHK 9.1058 Re: Teaching the Sonnets

On teaching the sonnets, I sometimes begin with Sonnet 138, "When my
love swears. . . ."  I ask them to find as many puns, double entendres,
etc. as they can.  Stephen Booth's edition helps in this.  My reason for
doing so is
1) It's a fun sonnet because it has to do with sex, 2) it helps to
define "characters" for the speaker and for the Dark Lady (so that we
can, in part, see later where those "characters" don't quite work in
other sonnets) and, most importantly, 3) to get students seeing how
Shakespeare plays with language.  The sooner they get used to reading
Shakespeare on multiple layers the better.  In fact, I sometimes start
with the sonnets before any of the plays.

Another thing I do comes from Heather Dubrow's article, "Shakespeare's
Undramatic Monologues: Toward a Reading of the Sonnets" that appeared in
SQ some years ago (I don't know the year).  Without going into detail, I
give my unsuspecting students a printout of sonnet 33 in which, a la
Dubrow, I have replaced the actual closing couplet with these lines: "I
thought our love an everlasting day/ And yet my trust thou didst, my
love, betray."  As a result, we talk about narrativity and "character."
Somewhere in the discussion I we look at the actual closing couplet.
Good luck!

Re: Model Globe Theatres

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.1072  Saturday, 31 October 1998.

[1]     From:   Janet Maclellan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 29 Oct 1998 12:27:30 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Model Globe Theatres

[2]     From:   David Nicol <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 29 Oct 1998 11:44:21 PST
        Subj:   re: Models of the Globe


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Janet Maclellan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 29 Oct 1998 12:27:30 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Model Globe Theatres

As an alternative to prefab, you might want to offer a pair or small
group of your students the opportunity to research and construct a model
of the Globe as one of their assignments (accompanied by short papers
on, e.g., the research process, problems associated with reconstruction,
implications for performance of the space modeled)--with the condition,
of course, that you get to keep the finished product. For the students,
it's not only a welcome change from the more usual essay topics, but a
valuable learning experience as well. (Any student who takes on such a
project under the misapprehension that it is a "bird" assignment will
soon discover otherwise.)

Janet MacLellan
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Nicol <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 29 Oct 1998 11:44:21 PST
Subject:        re: Models of the Globe

Hello,

A word of warning about the do-it-yourself models of the Globe Theatre
on sale at the RSC. They're INCREDIBLY fiddly! You have to cut out tiny
pieces of cardboard and do all sorts of intricate things to them. It's
not for amateurs. I gave up in the end, having spent many a tedious hour
wedging intransigent bits of cardboard into unlikely places. It really
isn't worth the hassle. Life's too short.

Yours,
David Nicol

Announcements

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.1073  Saturday, 31 October 1998.

[1]     From:   Joanne Walen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 29 Oct 1998 13:19:25 EST
        Subj:   Announcement: Stratford (England) Course

[2]     From:   Robert F. O'Connor <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 30 Oct 1998 11:05:31 +1100
        Subj:   Announcement

[3]     From:   A. Coldiron <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 30 Oct 1998 14:47:58 -0500
        Subj:   [Fwd: Call for Papers: Southeastern Renaissance Conference]


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Joanne Walen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 29 Oct 1998 13:19:25 EST
Subject:        Announcement: Stratford (England) Course

The 4th annual "Shakespeare at Stratford: Text and Theater" summer study
group in collaboration with the Shakespeare Centre and the Shakespeare
Institute, University of Birmingham, will take place June 20-27, 1999 in
Stratford-upon-Avon, England. We will see six  productions of the Royal
Shakespeare Company (plays to be announced after the new year), talk
with actors and scholars, go backstage, and connect with new ideas. We
will talk, debate, observe, talk some more, and laugh. All the while we
will be very well looked after in private guest houses where someone
else will do the cooking for breakfast and dinner.  The cost of $975*,
airfare not included, covers seven nights' lodging with full breakfasts
daily, five guest house dinners, one group restaurant dinner, entrance
fees to all Shakespeare properties, excellent tickets for six RSC
productions, pre-show lectures and post-show discussions with scholars
from the Centre and Institute, and three guest discussions with RSC
actors.  Travel is on an airline and at a fare of your choice. *The cost
is based on the exchange rate, the anticipated lodging and ticket
prices, and an enrollment of 15 participants. The final price may vary
slightly up or down.

For further information and references, contact Joanne Walen
<This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>, or 602-807-5114 (until April 1).

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Robert F. O'Connor <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 30 Oct 1998 11:05:31 +1100
Subject:        Announcement

The Shakespeare Globe Centre Australia - the only Australian affiliate
of the Globe Centre in London - now has a presence on-line!  We can be
found at

http://www.edfac.usyd.edu.au/projects/sgca/sgca.html

There's information about the Centre and its activities, particularly
our education program and national festival.  We hope in time to make
the site a comprehensive resource for information about Shakespeare
performance and scholarship in Australia.

If you'd like to know more, take a look at the site, or mail us on
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Rob O'Connor

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           A. Coldiron <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 30 Oct 1998 14:47:58 -0500
Subject:        [Fwd: Call for Papers: Southeastern Renaissance Conference]

Please Cross-Post to all Relevant groups!

Reminder: Call  for Papers

The Southeastern Renaissance Conference announces plans for its 56th
annual meeting, hosted by the Savannah College of Art & Design, in
Savannah, Georgia, April 9-11, 1999.

This meeting of the Southeastern Renaissance Conference will be held
jointly with the annual meeting of the South Central Renaissance
Conference, providing for a busy three days of papers and sessions.

Jackson Boswell, President of the Southeastern Renaissance Conference,
is now receiving papers on all aspects of Renaissance/early modern
literature, art, history, and thought.

Send two copies and a one-page abstract postmarked by January 15, 1999

To Jackson Boswell, President
Southeastern Renaissance Conference
2805 Seventh Street North, Arlington, Virginia 22201

All papers submitted will be considered for publication in RENAISSANCE
PAPERS, the journal of the Southeastern Renaissance Conference

Membership in the Southeastern Renaissance Conference includes
registration at the annual meeting and a subscription to RENAISSANCE
PAPERS. To join, send annual dues of $12.50 to John N. Wall, Secretary
Treasurer, Department of English, Box 8105, NC State University,
Raleigh, NC 27695.

The Southeastern Renaissance Conference and the South Central
Renaissance Conferences are regional conferences of the Renaissance
Society of America.

--
John N. Wall
email:  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
WWW:  http://www4.ncsu.edu/unity/users/j/jnweg/html

Re: Isabella and Sex

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.1071  Saturday, 31 October 1998.

[1]     From:   Carol Barton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 29 Oct 1998 10:23:32 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.1064  Re: Isabella and Sex

[2]     From:   David Evett <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 30 Oct 1998 16:36:07 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.1064 Re: Isabella and Sex


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Carol Barton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 29 Oct 1998 10:23:32 EST
Subject: 9.1064  Re: Isabella and Sex
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.1064  Re: Isabella and Sex

> Dave Evett scores a palpable hit when he argues that convent life can be
>  a struggle and therefore active. In reality, that is the Catholic
>  position-that chastity and renunciation of the world can be a great
>  adventure in which one is tried and one is very active in maintaining
>  his or her virtue. But, Dave, did an English Renaissance audience buy
>  this argument, as good as it is? I think you will agree that such an
>  audience would not. The vogue and sway of the times was for the 'active
>  life" as defined by, say, Sidney and Queen Elizabeth. So, despite the
>  truth of Dave's argument, I don't think the play endorses it.
>
>  Historically,
>  --Ed Taft

Slightly later, in Areopagitica, Milton will declare that he "cannot
praise a fugitive and cloister'd virtue, unexercised and unbreathed,
that never sallies out and seeks her adversary, but slinks out of the
race where that immortal garland is to be run for, not without dust and
heat"-I agree with Ed, that the at least nominally Anglican party line
under Elizabeth and James would have similarly rejected the via
contempliva and Isabella's endorsement of it as a way of escaping
confrontation with vice.

Best,
Carol Barton
Department of English
Averett College

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Evett <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 30 Oct 1998 16:36:07 -0500
Subject: 9.1064 Re: Isabella and Sex
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.1064 Re: Isabella and Sex

> that is the Catholic
> position-that chastity and renunciation of the world can be a great
> adventure in which one is tried and one is very active in maintaining
> his or her virtue. But, Dave, did an English Renaissance audience buy
> this argument, as good as it is? I think you will agree that such an
> audience would not. The vogue and sway of the times was for the 'active
> life" as defined by, say, Sidney and Queen Elizabeth. So, despite the
> truth of Dave's argument, I don't think the play endorses it.

I don't think "the vogue and sway of the time" necessarily matters.
Some probably did buy the argument: on the evidence of poems like "The
Collar" and "Batter My Heart" Herbert and Donne found the psychomachia
just as strenuous in their respective Protestant equivalent of the
cloister as they had during their lives at court or Inn of Court, and
evidently expected readers to understand that.  Even the intensely
Protestant Spenser offers his readers glimpses, not just of the delusory
refuge of Archimago's hermitage but of places such as the House of
Holiness, where Red Crosse undergoes a very severe regimen indeed (see
FQ 1.10.24-28).  But in any case, by dramatizing a whole series of
situations in which retirement does not procure relief from moral
struggle but rather amplifies it-the Duke (another nominal monastic)
retired from duking; Mariana, retired to the moated grange; Claudio,
retired (without willing it, to be sure) to the quiet of a jail cell;
Barnardine, the exception who proves the rule by being called on to
struggle and declining, retired anomically to another jail cell-the play
reconstructs that "Catholic" understanding of the active life without
ever getting explicitly into doctrinal quarrels, so that a Protestant
audience or reader gets educated in the alternative view of the active
life by the play itself.

Actively,
Dave Evett

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