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Home :: Archive :: 1998 :: October ::
Re: Bankside Globe
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0925  Thursday, 1 October 1998.

[1]     From:   William Williams <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 30 Sep 1998 09:26:00 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0921  Re: Bankside Globe

[2]     From:   Sean Lawrence <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 30 Sep 1998 09:25:52 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0921  Re: Bankside Globe

[3]     From:   Ed Pixley <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 30 Sep 1998 15:10:43 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0921  Re: Bankside Globe


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           William Williams <
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Date:           Wednesday, 30 Sep 1998 09:26:00 -0500
Subject: 9.0921  Re: Bankside Globe
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0921  Re: Bankside Globe

"Try Marianne MacDonald, 'Globe director looks forward to the bear pit',

The Independent, 2 August 1995.  As I recall, the title was an accurate
reflection of Rylance's comments in the interview-more or less `come
and  pelt us'.

Gabriel Egan"

With all respect to Gabriel Egan, I don't think an article one year
before even the Prologue Season, with a headline written by the subs at
the Indy is going to cause an audience in August of 1998 to engage in
"unseemly" conduct.  I repeat my request for evidence.

WPW

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean Lawrence <
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Date:           Wednesday, 30 Sep 1998 09:25:52 -0700
Subject: 9.0921  Re: Bankside Globe
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0921  Re: Bankside Globe

> I somehow free associate to the tribune's angry remonstrances to the
> crowd at the beginning of Julius Caesar in this connection-referring to
> them as "blocks"  "worse than stones" or somesuch, chiding them for
> their shallowness short memory re Pompey etc  similar stuff in
> Coriolanus indeed very fulcrum of the play is C's fury at the
> "groundlings"
>
> Anyone with further thoughts on the subject?  hr greenberg md

You might also look at the penultimate scene of Henry VIII.  By the way,
why do we think that only the so-called groundlings are the objects of
these attacks?  Could the audience as a whole be implied?  In which
case, these attacks have a vaguely levelling effect, since instead of
the lower classes being kept in line, all classes are placed under
judgement by the characters, whose difference from them is not social
but ontological.

Cheers,
Sean.

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ed Pixley <
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Date:           Wednesday, 30 Sep 1998 15:10:43 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 9.0921  Re: Bankside Globe
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0921  Re: Bankside Globe

> . . . .  If you do not encourage a reaction, a lifetime of polite
> theater going will tend to make auditors of us all.  Perhaps we need a
> nudge to move us to behave like an Elizabethan audience?

Obviously, Mike wrote a great deal more than the above, and good stuff
it was, but this little section caught my attention particularly.

On at least two occasions, Shakespeare has Hamlet refer to "hearing a
play," as opposed to seeing one.  Was Hamlet reflecting an expectation
of the time about how audiences did behave or a personal prejudice about
how audiences should behave?  With that in mind, when did we start to
call that group of people "audiences" and the space from which they
experience the play "auditoriums"?  Obviously John Burbage was already
using the -theatron_ (seeing place) image in naming his 1576 playhouse.
I'm sure that ample research exists on this terminology, but I wondered
whether it has any relevance to the current discussion.

Ed Pixley
SUNY-Oneonta
 

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