1998

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0937  Monday, 5 October 1998.

[1]     From:   Nora Kreimer <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 2 Oct 1998 18:26:33 -0300
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0928  Re: "Shakespeare as television writer?"

[2]     From:   Justin Bacon <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Sunday, 04 Oct 1998 01:17:26 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0916  Q: Citation for "Shakespeare as television
writer?"


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Nora Kreimer <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 2 Oct 1998 18:26:33 -0300
Subject: 9.0928  Re: "Shakespeare as television writer?"
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0928  Re: "Shakespeare as television writer?"

There's another article that might be of use concerning the topic of
Shakespeare & TV in SHAKESPEARE IN THE CHANGING CURRICULUM  edited by
Leslie Aers and Nigel Wheale, 1991, Routledge, London & New York. ISBN
o-415-05393-5 pbk

Hope to be of use again.

Regards,
Nora Kreimer
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Justin Bacon <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 04 Oct 1998 01:17:26 -0500
Subject: 9.0916  Q: Citation for "Shakespeare as television
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0916  Q: Citation for "Shakespeare as television
writer?"

> Here's why I'm in need: in my third chapter I talk about the old cliche
> that if Shakespeare were working today he'd be a television writer-that
> is, he'd be working in the ultimate mass medium.  Does anybody know
> where this cliche comes from?  Where I can find a reference to it in
> print?  Have any of y'all written it down in an essay that has then been
> published?

Although I am unwilling to swear upon a stack of Bibles, the only place
in print which I can remember seeing this cliche set down is actually in
a young adult's novel named ORDINARY JACK, the author of which escapes
me (it is sitting on a bookshelf several hundred miles away). This
predates the other cited sources by at least two decades (the book was
published in the '70s IIRC).

I am sorry I cannot provide a more exact citation for you. However, it
might help you to know that the quote is from the father in the book,
who writes teleplays.

Justin Bacon
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