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Home :: Archive :: 1998 :: October ::
Re: Ed3
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0958  Wednesday, 7 October 1998.

[1]     From:   Karen E Peterson-Kranz <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 7 Oct 1998 10:56:04 +1000 (GMT+1000)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0945  Re: Ed3

[2]     From:   Sean Lawrence <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 06 Oct 1998 21:31:57 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0945  Re: Ed3


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Karen E Peterson-Kranz <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Wednesday, 7 Oct 1998 10:56:04 +1000 (GMT+1000)
Subject: 9.0945  Re: Ed3
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0945  Re: Ed3

To James Moore and whoever else is out there...

There have been some recommendations for Ed3 texts in recent notes to
this list.  For The Two Noble Kinsmen, I would recommend the version in
the Riverside Shakespeare.  The latter is very interesting: look,
especially, for developments of economic themes, and note the
explorations of the nature of same-sex friendship (and not just between
men!).  Recommended: read The Knight's Tale (Canterbury Tales; primary
source although I have argued that Shakespeare may have read Tesseida as
well).

Karen Peterson-Kranz

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean Lawrence <
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 >
Date:           Tuesday, 06 Oct 1998 21:31:57 -0700
Subject: 9.0945  Re: Ed3
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0945  Re: Ed3

Jonathan Hope wrote:

> Hwaet!, not only have we added a play to the canon, but someone in
> Charlottesville has been sitting on a text which proves that Shakespeare
> knew Old English!  Truly we live in momentous times for the study of
> early modern drama.

You're far too modest in your claims.  I think this shows that
Shakespeare was actually not the Stratfordian actor of few discernible
opinions, but an 800-year-old vampire.  Such a life span would, among
other things, give him time to embrace all of the various religious and
political opinions that have been ascribed to him.

This forum could be used to petition for an opening of his tomb in order
to uncover evidence of beheading or staking.  On the other hand, the
curse on anyone disturbing the grave might actually be an allusion to
his rising again...  Where's that guy who's writing the "Forever Knight"
novels when we need him?

Yours darkly,
Sean.
 

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