Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 1998 :: October ::
Re: Evil Women
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.1013  Tuesday, 20 October 1998.

[1]     From:   Geralyn Horton <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Monday, 19 Oct 1998 17:53:43 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.1006 Re: Evil Women

[2]     From:   Eric W Beato <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Monday, 19 Oct 1998 22:28:03 -0400
        Subj:   Evil Woman


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Geralyn Horton <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Monday, 19 Oct 1998 17:53:43 -0400
Subject: 9.1006 Re: Evil Women
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.1006 Re: Evil Women

> The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.1006  Monday, 19 October 1998.

I'm amazed that no one has nominated the Queen from Cymbeline.  Women
don't come much worse than that, outside of the Brothers Grimm.

G.L.Horton <http://www.tiac.net/users/ghorton>

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Eric W Beato <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Monday, 19 Oct 1998 22:28:03 -0400
Subject:        Evil Woman

Having been a SHAKPER member for a short few months, I have read with
interest the interplay of ideas.  I decided that I would wait and think
before adding my two cents to the discussion.  The pair of pennies
follows: John Ramsay offers several valid arguments on behalf of
Gertrude, so I would agree that we might leave her name off our list of
"evil women." Lady Macbeth is another matter.  He suggests that 'she is
evil, but to what end?  She never speaks in terms of herself, only her
husband.'   His following comparison is to Othello, who 'loved not
wisely but too well.' My students would disagree. Her  words may not be
overtly self-centered, but her every desire for her husband to become
King may indeed be entirely directed at making her Queen.

Her "evil" credentials may be beyond reproach.   She invites the
'murdering ministers' of the night to enter her and fill her with
cruelty while dismissing her husband as 'too full of the milk of human
kindness.'  She plays her husband's feeling as she might play a violin,
talking him back into the murder plot when Macbeth states unequivocally
that they 'will proceed no further in this business.'  She speaks
disdainfully of her husband in several locations, generally referring to
him as the opposite of a 'man'-in fact, a coward.

The power of the 'give me the daggers' after the death of Duncan
establishes her as belonging on our list of "evil women."  'I would
shame to wear a heart so weak' she adds.  Totally supportive of her
loving husband?  I have always seen her as conniving her way to the
throne-for herself.

Rick Beato
Lisle Senior High School -- Illinois
 

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.