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Home :: Archive :: 1998 :: October ::
Re: NYC Bar Event; Evil; Isabella and Sex; Simba's
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.1064  Thursday, 29 October 1998.

[1]     From:   Kristine Batey <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 28 Oct 1998 11:39:55 -0600
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.1052 Invitation to NYC Bar Association event

[2]     From:   Christine Mack Gordon <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 28 Oct 1998 14:14:53 CST6CDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.1045 Re: Evil

[3]     From:   Ed Taft <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 28 Oct 1998 14:57:01 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Isabella and Sex

[4]     From:   Susan Medina <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 28 Oct 1998 22:38:24 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.1054  The Lion King II: Simba's Pride


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Kristine Batey <
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Date:           Wednesday, 28 Oct 1998 11:39:55 -0600
Subject: 9.1052 Invitation to NYC Bar Association event
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.1052 Invitation to NYC Bar Association event

>The Association of the Bar of the City of New York is presenting an
>evening entitled "TAMING OF THE SHREW: Katherina vs. Petruchio on
>Appeal."  This is apparently an argument on appeal of an imagined
>lawsuit brought by Kate against Petruchio.  The "Court" is comprised of
>rather distinguished state and federal court judges as well as Howard
>Kissel, theater critic of The Daily News.  The flier states that
>"Evidence from TS will be performed by professional actors and law
>professors."

And me stuck here in Chicago. Sigh. Anybody know if this is going to be
taped?

Kristine Batey
Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois, USA

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[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Christine Mack Gordon <
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Date:           Wednesday, 28 Oct 1998 14:14:53 CST6CDT
Subject: 9.1045 Re: Evil
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.1045 Re: Evil

Evelyn Gajowski asked whether those participating in this thread have
read feminist criticism of Shakespeare written in the last two or three
decades; I'm sure that most of us have. In fact, I spent a good portion
of my graduate school years reading, absorbing, and applying feminist
criticism to a wide range of literature. The initial work in these areas
was quite engaging and, I think, provocative in positive ways. More
recently, I have found, some (though certainly not all) feminist
criticism has become engaged in self-absorbed, jargon-ridden discussions
that appear to me to have little to do with the study of literature. My
feminist perspective in the greater realms of life remains unchanged;
the value of feminist (and related post-modern) literary theories is
something about which I've become increasingly skeptical. Hence the
discussion of "evil" women seems a reasonable thread, though perhaps a
continued clarification of definitions is helpful, just as a discussion
of "evil" men would be.

Chris Gordon

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ed Taft <
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Date:           Wednesday, 28 Oct 1998 14:57:01 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Isabella and Sex

Alexandra Gerull makes some shrewd observations about isabella and her
predicament in *MM.* I think it is legitimate to infer that Isabella may
be "disgusted" with Vienna, not only as a hothouse of sex but in
general.  And who is responsible for these conditions? The Duke, of
course, insofar as anyone is responsible. He has a lot to answer for, no
doubt, and I suppose I don't turn against him (as some do) because he
does take responsibility for his lax rule and tries as best he can to do
better.  But in going into the convent, Isabella also decides to silence
herself and to let rust her amazing powers of persuasion, which are
clearly a "gift" from God and meant to be used, or so a Renaissance
audience would think.

Dave Evett scores a palpable hit when he argues that convent life can be
a struggle and therefore active. In reality, that is the Catholic
position-that chastity and renunciation of the world can be a great
adventure in which one is tried and one is very active in maintaining
his or her virtue. But, Dave, did an English Renaissance audience buy
this argument, as good as it is? I think you will agree that such an
audience would not. The vogue and sway of the times was for the 'active
life" as defined by, say, Sidney and Queen Elizabeth. So, despite the
truth of Dave's argument, I don't think the play endorses it.

Historically,
--Ed Taft

[4]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Susan Medina <
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Date:           Wednesday, 28 Oct 1998 22:38:24 EST
Subject: 9.1054  The Lion King II: Simba's Pride
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.1054  The Lion King II: Simba's Pride

This tidbit about Simba's Pride is very interesting considering that The
Lion King was basically the Disney retelling of Hamlet.  I love it when
there's a Shakespeare buff in charge of things!!!

Susan Medina
 

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