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Home :: Archive :: 1998 :: October ::
Various Responses
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.1074  Saturday, 31 October 1998.

[1]     From:   Sarah Hatchuel <
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        Date:   Thursday, 29 Oct 1998 14:11:49 +0100
        Subj:   Branagh's Twelfth Night

[2]     From:   Sean Lawrence <
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        Date:   Thursday, 29 Oct 1998 09:27:09 -0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.1061  Re: Lear

[3]     From:   John Owen <
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        Date:   Thu, 29 Oct 1998 21:51:23 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.1055 Elizabeth / Charlton Heston

[4]     From:   Lysbeth Benkert-Rasmussen <
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        Date:   Friday, 30 Oct 98 15:13:00 CST
        Subj:   RE: SHK 9.1006  Re: Evil Women

[5]     From:   Richard A. Burt <
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        Date:   Thursday, 29 Oct 1998 11:12:30 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   The Lion King II

[6]     From:   Frances K. Barasch <
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        Date:   Thu, 29 Oct 1998 19:25:17 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.1044 Re: Puppet Query

[7]     From:   Peter T. Hadorn <
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        Date:   Thu, 29 Oct 1998 11:46:14 -0600
        Subj:   RE: SHK 9.1058 Re: Teaching the Sonnets


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sarah Hatchuel <
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Date:           Thursday, 29 Oct 1998 14:11:49 +0100
Subject:        Branagh's Twelfth Night

Judy Lewis wrote:

>According to my copy, Twelfth Night was produced by Branagh but
>directed by Paul Kafno.

Twelfth Night was directed by Kenneth Branagh for the Renaissance
Theatre Company in 1987. The play was so successful that it was filmed
for TV in 1988. The TV director was indeed Paul Kafno, but what he did
was just to choose the camera angles and cuts. When you buy the video of
a play, you must not forget to make the difference between the director
of the play and the TV director-who only comes after the "real"
directing job.

Sarah Hatchuel
University of Rouen, France

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean Lawrence <
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Date:           Thursday, 29 Oct 1998 09:27:09 -0800
Subject: 9.1061  Re: Lear
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.1061  Re: Lear

I wrote:

> Basically, I'd say that there's a difference between whether something
> is good and whether it's conceivable at all.  There are any number of
> Shakespearean kings whose rule is held for them.  This sort of rule by
> proxy is usually dire in its results, but nobody seemed to have
> conceiving of it.

My apologies to anyone who tried to understand this message.  The last
sentence should read, in part, "nobody seemed to have difficulty
conceiving of it."

Apologetically,
Sean.

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Owen <
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Date:           Thu, 29 Oct 1998 21:51:23 EST
Subject: 9.1055 Elizabeth / Charlton Heston
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.1055 Elizabeth / Charlton Heston

I believe you are referring to a Hallmark Hall of Fame production of
Maxwell Anderson's Elizabeth and Essex, starring Judith Anderson as
Queen Bess and Heston as Essex. George Schaffer directed. The Hallmark
series was very briefly released a while back and seems to have
completely disappeared. A pity, because there is some interesting stuff
there.

Now, I would like someone to answer this question. In and around 1960,
Schaeffer turned his Hallmark production of the Evans/Anderson Macbeth
into a feature film. Older editions of Halliwell's film guide show it,
but the Internet Movie Database entry is horribly inaccurate. Evans was
not a great Macbeth, but Anderson was marvelous in the TV version. In
the film version, a high-powered supporting cast was acquired - Ian
Bannen as Macduff, Michael Hordern as Banquo, Jeremy Brett as
Malcolm-and I think the film is probably worth seeing for their sake.
Has anyone seen this mysterious film, which seems to have completely
disappeared? And does anyone know if it has been shown on TV recently or
appeared on Video?

John Owen
Campbell, CA

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Lysbeth Benkert-Rasmussen <
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Date:           Friday, 30 Oct 98 15:13:00 CST
Subject: 9.1006  Re: Evil Women
Comment:        RE: SHK 9.1006  Re: Evil Women

This is a bit belated, but if we could for a few minutes go back to
Gertrude.

Although I can't say that Gertrude has always made a great deal of sense
to me, I don't think that could ever say that I saw her as evil.  Now
that I have been living in the mid-west for a few years, I think I have
come to an understanding of Gertrude that I didn't have before.

1.  Illustrated clearly by Polonius's treatment of Ophelia, the culture
portrayed by the play is one in which women are seen as property-she is
her father's bargaining chip while she lives in his house; she becomes
her husband's property after marriage, and once he dies, well, if she
has a jointure great, if not she' out of luck and on her own.  Gertrude
is a woman who has suddenly been cut off from the only social/economic
protection available to her-her husband.  What is a queen supposed to do
in a strictly patriarchal society when her husband dies?  Well, what did
Katherine Parr do-she re-married as fast as she could.

2.  Once she has re-married, Gertrude appears to have the impulse to do
what so many women (especially women in the upper mid-west from what
I've seen so far) to "make nice."  She has made compromises in her life
and now she can't see why her son can't do the same thing and just be
nice.  The very first words she speaks in the play are caluculated to
smooth over a coming confrontation that she foresees and is trying
desperately to aviod.  She just wants him to pretend he's happy, but
especially, not to fight in front of the company.

[5]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard A. Burt <
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Date:           Thursday, 29 Oct 1998 11:12:30 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        The Lion King II

There's an article on The Lion King II in the current issue of TV Guide
by Stephen Rea that also notes the R and J connection, as well as the
Hamlet Lion King connection.

R

[6]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Frances K. Barasch <
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Date:           Thu, 29 Oct 1998 19:25:17 EST
Subject: 9.1044 Re: Puppet Query
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.1044 Re: Puppet Query

To Andy White: thanks for suggestion on Czech puppetry; can you
recommend any publications on the subject?

To John Dwyer: thanks for the Speaight reference.

All and more advice will be appreciated.

Frances K. Barasch

[7]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Peter T. Hadorn <
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Date:           Thu, 29 Oct 1998 11:46:14 -0600
Subject: 9.1058 Re: Teaching the Sonnets
Comment:        RE: SHK 9.1058 Re: Teaching the Sonnets

On teaching the sonnets, I sometimes begin with Sonnet 138, "When my
love swears. . . ."  I ask them to find as many puns, double entendres,
etc. as they can.  Stephen Booth's edition helps in this.  My reason for
doing so is
1) It's a fun sonnet because it has to do with sex, 2) it helps to
define "characters" for the speaker and for the Dark Lady (so that we
can, in part, see later where those "characters" don't quite work in
other sonnets) and, most importantly, 3) to get students seeing how
Shakespeare plays with language.  The sooner they get used to reading
Shakespeare on multiple layers the better.  In fact, I sometimes start
with the sonnets before any of the plays.

Another thing I do comes from Heather Dubrow's article, "Shakespeare's
Undramatic Monologues: Toward a Reading of the Sonnets" that appeared in
SQ some years ago (I don't know the year).  Without going into detail, I
give my unsuspecting students a printout of sonnet 33 in which, a la
Dubrow, I have replaced the actual closing couplet with these lines: "I
thought our love an everlasting day/ And yet my trust thou didst, my
love, betray."  As a result, we talk about narrativity and "character."
Somewhere in the discussion I we look at the actual closing couplet.
Good luck!
 

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