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Home :: Archive :: 1998 :: September ::
Re: Plagiarism in Schools / Colleges
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0796  Friday, 4 September 1998.

[1]     From:   Fran Teague <
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        Date:   Thursday, 3 Sep 1998 11:09:31 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0790  Re: Plagiarism in Schools / Colleges

[2]     From:   Eva McManus <
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        Date:   Thursday, 3 Sep 1998 14:42:35 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0790  Re: Plagiarism in Schools / Colleges

[3]     From:   Brooke Brod <
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        Date:   Friday, 4 Sep 1998 09:47:57 EDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0790 Re: Plagiarism in Schools / Colleges

[4]     From:   Hardy M. Cook <
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        Date:   Friday, September 4, 1998
        Subj:   Thanks


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Fran Teague <
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Date:           Thursday, 3 Sep 1998 11:09:31 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 9.0790  Re: Plagiarism in Schools / Colleges
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0790  Re: Plagiarism in Schools / Colleges

For the questioner who asked how to deal with plagiarists who use
Internet sources: One of the best ways to handle such cases is to know
what material is on the web, just as any responsible teacher will have
an idea of what's available to students in the library. We may not know
every single item intimately, but most of us can make a good guess about
where a student might head in the library when seeking information on a
particular topic. To gain a similar sort of knowledge about the web
resources, we need to browse ourselves, not simply wait for problems to
arise. If you show students that you know about the materials on the
Luminarium site, for example, they are less likely to poach from it. I'd
also like to second the suggestion that teachers engage classes in
discussions of (a) how to carry out research responsibly and (b) what
ethical issues a research paper might raise. For the few students who
are irretrievably committed to cheating, the ease with which a good
search engine can locate a telling phrase in an HTML document makes it
surprisingly easy to locate a source. In short, an instructor who's
anxious about students' using the web could benefit from passing a few
days in the company of "Mr. William Shakespeare on the Internet," Terry
Gray's fabulous site, or from searching for material using a good search
engine like Alta Vista.

The Luminarium site: http://www.luminarium.org/lumina.htm
"Mr. William Shakespeare on the Internet":
http://daphne.palomar.edu/shakespeare/intro.htm
Alta Vista: http://altavista.digital.com/
And the University of Georgia site:
http://parallel.park.uga.edu/shaxper

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Eva McManus <
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Date:           Thursday, 3 Sep 1998 14:42:35 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 9.0790  Re: Plagiarism in Schools / Colleges
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0790  Re: Plagiarism in Schools / Colleges

I'm glad to see the questions and comments on electronic plagiarism and
hope we will expand the discussion along broader lines once we've dealt
with the initial issues.  David G. Hale (State University of New York)
just published a useful article entitled "More than Magic in the Web:
Plagiarism for the Shakespeare Class" in our most recent edition of
Shakespeare and the Classroom.  His article offers an overview of sites
currently being used by students to get plagiarized papers.  The options
available are depressingly high.  Hale also makes some comments on the
subject that might be of use to those getting ready to unleash their
students on the web.

Like many others, I am changing my courses to deal with the electronic
plagiarism possibilities.  In his article Hale suggests some helpful
ideas for designing assignments that will make it hard for students to
purchase appropriate papers or simply to copy assignments.  And as Hugh
Grady pointed out in a recent posting, we do need to help students be
aware of what constitutes valid sources on the internet vs. the personal
opinion pages.  We try to do that in freshman comp. Here at ONU but most
of us in our department are finding it hard to keep up with the variety
of types of sources out there as we steer students in appropriate
directions.

Hardy's examples of the requests for help  he gets from students raise
another issue, which is that there are now a number of Shakespeare
hotlines for students stumped while doing homework.  I know, for
instance, that the Colorado Shakespeare Festival at Boulder did have
such a hotline via phone for students and teachers and am also aware of
some  internet sources that profess to offer students help and
reassurance when approaching Shakespeare.  My hope is that  these
sources monitor the material they provide and are careful to keep in
mind what the students might do with it.  Last year I too received a few
unidentified, always urgent e-mail requests for help with Shakespeare
topics from people outside of our campus.  When I requested fuller
identification and information on what sources they had already worked
with, like Hardy,  I didn't hear from them a second time.

Again, Hale addresses some of these issues, but probably more of us with
Shakespeare Webpages for our courses and publications need to take this
problem into consideration.  When we post articles and student papers,
even as samples, we run this risk.  When my husband and I taught at
another university a number of years ago (in pre-internet days) and one
of the speech teachers gave out a sample student persuasive speech in
class, the English department ended up with 9 or more copies of it for
the persuasive essay in freshman comp. that quarter.   Internet access
just expands the pool.

When setting up the new Shakespeare and the Classroom  website now
available at (www.onu.edu/a%2bs/english/Shakespeare/index.html), the
editors opted not to post previously published articles, in part for
this reason.  Instead, we offer tables of contents to past editions and
links to other Shakespeare sources including the Globe pages.   I'm sure
dialogues must be going on about this issue with the boom in electronic
publishing, but I have not as yet participated; we may change our policy
once I do.  I'd be interested in expanding this plagiarism discussion to
cover  what others with Shakespeare websites and requirements for
participation in out-of-class electronic dialogues for their courses
think and/or do about plagiarism.

Eva McManus

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Brooke Brod <
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Date:           Friday, 4 Sep 1998 09:47:57 EDT
Subject: 9.0790 Re: Plagiarism in Schools / Colleges
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0790 Re: Plagiarism in Schools / Colleges

I have a couple of thoughts about the issue of plagiarism and the
requests for homework help.  As to the homework help:  I would recommend
the student speak to his teacher, or professor first and then to a
reference librarian.  Any reasonably good teacher should be available to
help a student answer simple question and help to develop a focused line
of inquiry for a paper. I am currently attending the University of Texas
at Austin and the have a study center with tutors and workshops
available to any student, who needs help with writing papers or
developing more efficient study skills.  I would think that other
universities would also have something similar to refer people to.

Now in regards to plagiarism:  Would it be practical to require students
to turn in a rough draft or an outline of a paper as part of the
assignment? This might make it easier to see if there has really been an
evolution of thought on the part of the student as well as be an
opportunity to learn something about the process of writing a paper.

Sincerely,
Brooke Brod

[4]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Hardy M. Cook <
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Date:           Friday, September 4, 1998
Subject:        Thanks

Thanks to all who wrote with suggestions on what I should do about
student questions. I am considering the suggestions carefully.

Hardy
 

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