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Home :: Archive :: 1998 :: September ::
Re: Caesar's Will
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0817  Wednesday, 9 September 1998.

[1]     From:   Louis Swilley <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 8 Sep 1998 07:24:11 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0811  Re: Caesar's Will

[2]     From:   Steve Sohmer <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 8 Sep 1998 11:39:04 EDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0811  Re: Caesar's Will


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Louis Swilley <
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 >
Date:           Tuesday, 8 Sep 1998 07:24:11 -0500
Subject: 9.0811  Re: Caesar's Will
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0811  Re: Caesar's Will

Whatever the value of the drachma or talent or "dolor,"  doesn't the
context of the remark sufficiently indicate its relative value?  In this
case of Caesar's will,  Antony's intention is to stress the generosity
of Caesar to a public that Antony is trying to sway in dead Caesar's
favor.  We should therefore conclude:  "It's a lot of money to a common
man of Rome; the crowd is impressed."  Need we more?

In this, I am reminded of a recent question about the "real" poison
Romeo might have used  to do himself in.  The answer?  It's the kind of
poison that has the effect that the director wants it to have; it's
available at any director's "drugstore."

L. Swilley

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Steve Sohmer <
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 >
Date:           Tuesday, 8 Sep 1998 11:39:04 EDT
Subject: 9.0811  Re: Caesar's Will
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0811  Re: Caesar's Will

Dear Friends,

Those who wish to delve deeper into the Renaissance value of money will
be entertained by thumbing "Handbook of Medieval Exchange" by Peter
Spufford, published in 1986 by the Royal Historical Society. The
conversion rate of Venetian ducat into the dyperpyra of Epiros (p.291)
will leave you panting for more.

Steve Sohmer
 

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