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Home :: Archive :: 1998 :: September ::
Re: Things British
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0829  Thursday, 10 September 1998.

[1]     From:   An Sonjae <
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        Date:   Thursday, 10 Sep 1998 09:57:23 +0900 (KST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0816 Things British

[2]     From:   Kenneth Meaney <
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        Date:   Thursday, 10 Sep 1998 10:02:03 +0300
        Subj:   Re: Things British

[3]     From:   Richard Dutton <
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        Date:   Thursdayy, 10 Sep 1998 08:56:00 +0100
        Subj:   RE: SHK 9.0816 Things British


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           An Sonjae <
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Date:           Thursday, 10 Sep 1998 09:57:23 +0900 (KST)
Subject: 9.0816 Things British
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0816 Things British

There is no competing with cultural materialist court jesters, but since
no one else has taken the plunge: the title 'Prince of Wales' is not
hereditary but the reigning monarch bestows it on his/her eldest son
during an investiture ceremony in Wales, usually when the said son has
come of age. The eldest son is born with the title 'Duke of Cornwall'
which entitles him to lots of money even without ever visiting Cornwall,
the estates being large. Daughters do not count for much and since there
is always the possibility that a son will be born later, they are merely
labeled Princess at birth. Any baby brother coming later gets the throne
before them anyway. When Liz/Brenda got spliced to her Greek sailor-boy,
wild comedy broke loose because he was a commoner. He was duly given the
title The Duke of Edinburgh to make it sound better and his new wife
therefore became Princess Elizabeth, Duchess of Edinburgh. I rather
think that poor Philip had to wait quite a while before he was given the
title 'Prince' (perhaps when his wife got promoted). The Princess of
Wales, as we all know, is the wife of the Prince of Wales, if he has
one.

An Sonjae, Seoul, Korea

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Kenneth Meaney <
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Date:           Thursday, 10 Sep 1998 10:02:03 +0300
Subject:        Re: Things British

Queen Elizabeth-or Brenda as Trev Hawkes would have it-was not Princess
of Wales before acceding to the throne. A woman becomes Princess of
Wales by marrying the Prince of Wales. This is the eldest son of the
reigning monarch, and hence heir to the throne. The title is not his
automatically and Prince Charles was otherwise known by his ducal title,
Duke of Cornwall, until the queen made him Prince of Wales. That was
when he was in his mid teens, if I remember correctly.

Queen Elizabeth was the elder daughter of George VI, who was Duke of
York until he came to the throne on the abdication of Edward VIII, who
should of course have been known as Edward II.

Ken Meaney

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard Dutton <
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Date:           Thursdayy, 10 Sep 1998 08:56:00 +0100
Subject: 9.0816 Things British
Comment:        RE: SHK 9.0816 Things British

To Tom Berger's queries:

The precise meaning of 'How's your (often pronounced 'yer') father'
would depend on its context, but it is commonly part of a euphemistic
invitation to sexual congress (as in 'How about a bit of "How's yer
father"?') though precisely how this arose, and what this might tell us
about deep-seated incestual instincts in English sexuality, I do not
know.

No, Princess Elizabeth was never Princess of Wales - that title only
goes with being married to a Prince of Wales. There is no automatic
formal title for any female in line for the throne - even one who is
heir presumptive (Elizabeth was never strictly heir apparent, because
any son born to George VI would automatically have inherited the
throne). Elizabeth became Duchess of Edinburgh because the Dukedom was
conferred on her husband (along with the title of 'Prince', which was
not automatic either) when they got married, which was 1947. There *is*
a special title for favoured daughters of monarchs - Princess Royal -
but that is conferred purely at the monarch's discretion (Princess Anne
was granted the title some years back) but it has never gone to any
princess in direct line for the throne. Isn't this whole business
tedious?

Richard Dutton
 

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