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Home :: Archive :: 1998 :: September ::
Re: Kurosawa; Used Books; Things British
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0840  Monday, 14 September 1998.

[1]     From:   Hugh H. Davis <
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        Date:   Friday, 11 Sep 1998 08:45:06 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0832  Re: Kurosawa

[2]     From:   Laura Fargas <
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        Date:   Saturday, 12 Sep 1998 13:03:47 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0827  Re: Used Books

[3]     From:   Judy Lewis <
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        Date:   Sunday, 13 Sep 1998 17:27:17 +1200
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0829  Re: Things British


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Hugh H. Davis <
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Date:           Friday, 11 Sep 1998 08:45:06 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 9.0832  Re: Kurosawa
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0832  Re: Kurosawa

Tom Sullivan wrote:
> I only regret that we will never see a film of _Hamlet_ by [Kurosawa].

Actually, Kurosawa's 1961 film _The Bad Sleep Well_ is a variation on
Hamlet, set in modern day Japan.  None of AK's modern films have carried
the same weight or reputation as his samurai and historical pictures, so
it hasn't made it to the US recently, but everything I've read about it
suggests it is a well-made film with careful choices by "the Emperor".

Hugh Davis

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Laura Fargas <
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 >
Date:           Saturday, 12 Sep 1998 13:03:47 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 9.0827  Re: Used Books
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0827  Re: Used Books

Christopher Warley wrote:

> To Curtis Perry's advice to Amy Ulen, I'd add bibliofind.com and
> powells.com, both truly amazing online used book sources.

There's a bookfinder metasearch now , www.mxbf.com, which searches
Amazon, Powell's, Bibliocity, the European Antiqbooks, and Advanced Book
Exchange.  It doesn't, however, include bibliofind.com.

Laura Fargas

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Judy Lewis <
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Date:           Sunday, 13 Sep 1998 17:27:17 +1200
Subject: 9.0829  Re: Things British
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0829  Re: Things British

An addition to the info given on the titles of Prince of Wales.

The title was first conferred on the eldest son of the monarch by Edward
I.  He had destroyed the Welsh nationalist cause by defeating the last
true Prince of Wales Daffydd ap Gryffedd, younger brother of the great
Llewellyn (who married, interestingly, the daughter of Simon de
Montfort, architect of the Magna Carta, and also defeated by Edward).
Edward made it part of his policy as king to destroy Welsh independence
and bring Wales under the rule of the English.  He tried to do the same
with Scotland but was thwarted by the Robert the Bruce and William
Wallace (though the truth of that bears little resemblance to the recent
Mel Gibson movie.)

Anyway, back to Wales.  Edward is said to have promised the Welsh as
part of the deal that he would give them a prince who was born in Wales
and spoke no English.  His son was born in Caernarvon Castle, and of
course, couldn't talk at all when Edward presented the baby to the Welsh
as their Welsh-born Prince of Wales.  The tradition of the title has
continued ever since.  This baby went on to become Edward II, marrying a
French princess who never met William Wallace/Mel Gibson since the
marriage took place in 1308, three years after Wallace's death, and the
first baby she bore was born in 1312 - which would be the longest
pregnancy in history if Wallace was the father.

The only child of George IV, Charlotte, was known as the Princess of
Wales, but whether this was as heir presumptive or because her father
was Prince of Wales (and Prince Regent) I don't know.  She never became
queen, because she died in child birth in 1817; her father succeeded to
the throne in 1820, having been Regent for a number of years (see The
Madness of King George), and on his death in 1830, he was succeeded by
his next brother William IV, who had no legitimate children.  On his
death in 1837, the 18 year old Victoria became Queen.
 

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