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Home :: Archive :: 1998 :: September ::
Re: Observations of Bedlam
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0848  Wednesday, 16 September 1998.

[1]     From:   Sara Vandenberg <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 15 Sep 1998 08:46:06 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0843  Re: Observations of Bedlam

[2]     From:   Roy Flannagan <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 15 Sep 1998 12:12:32 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0843  Re: Observations of Bedlam


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sara Vandenberg <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Tuesday, 15 Sep 1998 08:46:06 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 9.0843  Re: Observations of Bedlam
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0843  Re: Observations of Bedlam

In addition to Erika Lin's suggestions about Bedlam, for the more
general image of the poor you might check William C. Carroll, _Lean
King, Fat Beggar: Representations of Poverty in Shakespeare's Plays_
(Cornell, 1996).

Sara van den Berg
University of Washington

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Roy Flannagan <
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 >
Date:           Tuesday, 15 Sep 1998 12:12:32 -0400
Subject: 9.0843  Re: Observations of Bedlam
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0843  Re: Observations of Bedlam

Thanks very much for the help with books on melancholy (please add
Rosalie L. Colie and Lawrence Babb to that list) and insanity.  I did
know of <italic>Mystical Bedlam</italic>, which focuses on the medical
career of Sir Robert Napier, physician to (among many others) Lady Alice
Egerton, the Lady of Milton's <italic>Comus</italic>.

May I add to Alison Horton's post that Bethlehem/Bethlem/Bedlam Hospital
was in the northeast of London, off Bishopsgate Street, on the site of
the present Liverpool Station.  In about 1595 Shakespeare was living in
St. Helen's Parish, Bishopsgate.  He would have to pass the side street
on which Bethlem Hospital was located on his way to the Theatre and the
Curtain, located in Shoreditch.

One other titillating question: what drives Malvolio mad?

Roy Flannagan
 

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