1998

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0868  Monday, 21 September 1998.

[1]     From:   Niklas Seehaus <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Sunday, 20 Sep 1998 08:59:42 +0200
        Subj:   Julius Caesar

[2]     From:   Joanne Gates <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Saturday, 19 Sep 1998 17:01:25 -0500 (CDT)
        Subj:   Source for RIII Quotation


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Niklas Seehaus <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 20 Sep 1998 08:59:42 +0200
Subject:        Julius Caesar

I have just seen the 1953 black/white "Julius Caesar" film (USA),
featuring Marlon Brando as Antonius,  Louis Calhern as Caesar, and John
Gielgud as Cassius.  It is supposed to be one of the best Caesar films,
and I do like it. However, having read the play and seen it as a film, I
still do not find it very fascinating.  Much more exciting, among the
tragedies, are Macbeth, Titus, and Lear, I think.  Any comments?

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Joanne Gates <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 19 Sep 1998 17:01:25 -0500 (CDT)
Subject:        Source for RIII Quotation

I am editing a text rich in Shakespeare allusions.  I've checked MIT
searchable site, and suspect the quote is from the Colley Cibber
version.  Can someone check?

"Off with your head! So much for Buckingham" appears in _The Open
Question_, an 1898 novel by Elizabeth Robins (famous for acting Ibsen
parts in 1890s London).  The first line is a rewrite of "Off with his
head, spoken of Hastings when Hastings himself is on stage, III, iv. But
I cannot find "so much for ..."  ER in her diary rewrote Cibber's R3
line, "Richard's himself again" as "Elizabeth's herself again."

Can "So much for Buckingham" be in Cibber or another acting text?

By the way, Robins published a curiously phrased, but packed with
detail, recollection of Sarah Bernhardt doing Hamlet, and makes close
comparisons to her memory of Edwin Booth in the role.  It's on-line at
my "Elizabeth Robins Web,"  http://www.jsu.edu/depart/english/robins

Joanne Gates

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