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Home :: Archive :: 1998 :: September ::
Edward III
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0913  Tuesday, 29 September 1998.

[1]     From:   Lee Zhao <
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        Date:   Monday, 28 Sep 1998 11:41:22 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Edward III

[2]     From:   Lee Gibson <
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        Date:   Monday, 28 Sep 1998 10:56:15 -0500 (CDT)
        Subj:   Edward III play declared lost work by Shakespeare


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Lee Zhao <
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 >
Date:           Monday, 28 Sep 1998 11:41:22 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Edward III

I heard somewhere that a play named Edward III is not recognized as
authored by Shakespeare.  Am I alone on this, or has everyone else heard
it also?

Lee

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Lee Gibson <
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 >
Date:           Monday, 28 Sep 1998 10:56:15 -0500 (CDT)
Subject:        Edward III play declared lost work by Shakespeare

The Sunday Times of London
September 27 1998

                by John Harlow
              Arts Correspondent

A PLAY written 400 years ago about chivalry and daring deeds during the
reign of Edward III has been officially recognised as a "lost"
historical drama by William Shakespeare.

Since the work emerged in the early 1590s the author has been unknown,
although many attributed it to anonymous stagehands. Now Arden, the
official arbiter of Shakespeare's legacy, has decided it was one of his
earliest works.

The reappraisal stems from an American computer analysis of the text and
language of the seven surviving copies and has caused enormous
excitement among scholars and theatres eager to perform "fresh" works by
Shakespeare.

It is the first play to be upgraded from "anonymous" to Shakespeare
since the 1970s when The Two Noble Kinsmen joined the repertoire,
ensuring that it has become one of the most popular recent hits for the
Royal Shakespeare Company (RSC). Edward III would become Shakespeare's
39th play.

The Arden series, which is being revised for only the third time since
the 19th century, will add Edward III to its student texts early next
century but theatre directors are already considering who they can cast
as the warrior king.

Professor Richard Proudfoot, senior editor at Arden, said: "The computer
has been a great help. The Arden text will give authority to the
accumulating strength of opinion that Edward III is significantly
Shakespearian."

The five-act play was written in 1594-95, between Titus Andronicus and
Romeo and Juliet, when the young Shakespeare was "resting" while
London's theatres were closed because of plague. He wrote it with
friends such as the playwright George Peel, a collaboration that had
hindered attribution in the past.

Edward III was not a hit, however, and four years later was repressed by
the court, worried that its fierce condemnation of marauding Scots was
unacceptable as James VI of Scotland prepared to succeed Elizabeth I.

There have been occasional debates about its authorship during the past
four centuries and in 1904 it was included on a list of 14 potential
Shakespeare works. The play, unperformed between 1599 and 1987, when
Theatr Clwyd put on a short version attributed to "?", tells of the
first campaigns of the hundred years war when British monarchs attempted
to reclaim their Norman territories in France while also holding off
Scots from the north.

Edward III (1312-1377) was responsible for some of the most famous
victories in British military history: Sluys (1340), when he destroyed
the French navy, and Cr

 

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