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Home :: Archive :: 1998 :: September ::
Re: Horatio; Sh. in Love; Interpretations
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0914  Tuesday, 29 September 1998.

[1]     From:   Ed Taft <
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        Date:   Monday, 28 Sep 1998 11:42:58 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Origins of Horatio

[2]     From:   Jerry Bangham <
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        Date:   Monday, 28 Sep 1998 11:48:12 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Shakespeare in Love

[3]     From:   Judy Lewis <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 29 Sep 1998 19:09:50 +1200
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0863  Re: Editorial/Interpretational Practices


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ed Taft <
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Date:           Monday, 28 Sep 1998 11:42:58 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Origins of Horatio

For whatever it is worth, the word *Horatio* contains (1) oratio and (2)
ratio within it, the former presumably relates to rhetoric and Horatio's
"plain speaking" style, while the latter relates to the rationality that
Horatio prides himself on. For the record, I'd bet that there was a
Horatio in the lost *Ur-Hamlet* by Kyd.

--Ed Taft

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jerry Bangham <
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Date:           Monday, 28 Sep 1998 11:48:12 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Shakespeare in Love

I was able to visit the Rose site this summer (it should be opening to
the public soon).

We were shown photographs of the Rose replica used in _Shakespeare in
Love_. If I remember correctly (and I may not) the replica was given to
Judi Dench who plans to re-erect it somewhere.

On the basis of the photos, the film may have some visual interest, if
nothing else

Jerry Bangham

        1209 Market St.
        Port Gibson, MS 39150
        (601) 437-4107

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Judy Lewis <
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 >
Date:           Tuesday, 29 Sep 1998 19:09:50 +1200
Subject: 9.0863  Re: Editorial/Interpretational Practices
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0863  Re: Editorial/Interpretational Practices

> I just staged an As You Like It recently that served as a comparison
> between the confining corporate world of today, and the freedom of the
> country life.  We used contemporary country songs during the show,
> danced the Achy Breaky, and had a slickly black-dressed Duke Fred (as a
> Bill Gates-Robert DeNiro in Devils Advocate type).  The production
> served fairly well, I think, to show the comparisons of these two areas
> of life, and also how Rosalind, Celia, Touchstone, Orlando and Oliver,
> gradually free themselves of the oppressive corporate lifestyle in favor
> of the freedom of the life of the country folk.  I think this very much
> speaks to a contemporary audience where doublets, hose, and gowns would
> certainly have no relation to life today.

Drew Mason may have staged an As You Like It that 'spoke' to his
contemporary audience, but it is not the As You Like It that Shakespeare
wrote.  To suggest that the world of the court is oppressive and that of
the forest is liberating is a simplistic and inaccurate reading of the
text.  There is much good at court - Le Beau's kindness, Touchstone's
loyalty, Celia's devoted affection - and much that is not enjoyable in
the forest - lions and snakes, the 'winter wind', Corin working for an
unkind master who does not pay him well and is unkind to strangers, the
hedge priest, the lumpish William, to mention just a few.  And at the
end of the play, when the 'second son of old Sir Rowland' brings the
news of the restoration of the Duke's position, only Jacques chooses to
stay rather than join the rest of the involuntary foresters who return
as fast as they can to the comforts of the court.  Indeed, a RSC
production I saw in London last year (a terrible production, I might
add, from a company that should do better) even had old Adam die at the
picnic - eaten in the falling snow - when he and Orland first arrive in
the Forest of Arden.
 

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