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Home :: Archive :: 1998 :: September ::
Re: Titus
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0915  Tuesday, 29 September 1998.

[1]     From:   David Evett <
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        Date:   Monday, 28 Sep 1998 14:09:57 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0904  Re: Titus: The Movie

[2]     From:   R. Schmeeckle <
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        Date:   Monday, 28 Sep 1998 13:24:21 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0904  Re: Titus: The Movie


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Evett <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
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Date:           Monday, 28 Sep 1998 14:09:57 -0400
Subject: 9.0904  Re: Titus: The Movie
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0904  Re: Titus: The Movie

I think it's useful to see the rhetorical and dramatic "excesses" of
*Titus* as operatic: big events producing big emotions.  And it
incorporates a pretty comprehensive and serious look at how (not) to
lead and govern, with an appalling look at what happens to the women and
children when the men's pride, egotism, lust, and mindless endorsement
of patriarchal rigidities screw things up in the usual way.

Dave Evett

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           R. Schmeeckle <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Monday, 28 Sep 1998 13:24:21 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 9.0904  Re: Titus: The Movie
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0904  Re: Titus: The Movie

On the subject of Titus.  It is my personal interpretation, based on
reading and having seen a production on the stage, that Titus was
intended as a spoof of revenge plays that featured lots of grisly
bloodshed.  After a certain point, it becomes impossible to take it
seriously, and it becomes laughable.

Watching the father on the stage dragging his son's decapitated head
around the stage by the hair, it was all I could do to contain myself
and not burst out laughing.  I later learned that the director had no
ironic intention at all, he was very serious about it.

I am curious whether anyone knows of any scholarly work(s) that supports
my interpretation of Titus as spoof.
 

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