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Home :: Archive :: 1998 :: September ::
Re: "Shakespeare as television writer?"
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0920  Wednesday, 30 September 1998.

[1]     From:   Dale Lyles <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 29 Sep 1998 12:23:05 EDT
        Subj:   Re: Q: Citation for "Shakespeare as television writer?"

[2]     From:   Richard A. Burt <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 29 Sep 1998 15:41:50 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: Q: Citation for "Shakespeare as television writer?"

[3]     From:   Nora Kreimer <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 29 Sep 1998 19:35:05 -0300
        Subj:   Re: Q: Citation for "Shakespeare as television writer?"

[4]     From:   Peggy O'Brien <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 29 Sep 1998 22:11:44 -0500
        Subj:   Re: Q: Citation for "Shakespeare as television writer?"


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Dale Lyles <
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Date:           Tuesday, 29 Sep 1998 12:23:05 EDT
Subject:        Re: Q: Citation for "Shakespeare as television writer?"

Television?  I always tell students and actors that Shakespeare wrote
for radio.  "So this is the forest of Arden.."  "But room, fairy, here
comes Oberon..."  "Come, bloody Clifford, rough Northumberland..."

Dale Lyles
Newnan Community Theatre Company

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard A. Burt <
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Date:           Tuesday, 29 Sep 1998 15:41:50 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Re: Q: Citation for "Shakespeare as television writer?"

I have heard more frequently that Shakespeare would write for
Hollywood.   This view was articulated on the A & E biography that aired
in 1997.

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Nora Kreimer <
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Date:           Tuesday, 29 Sep 1998 19:35:05 -0300
Subject:        Re: Q: Citation for "Shakespeare as television writer?"

In IS SHAKESPEARE STILL OUR CONTEMPORARY, edited by Joh Elsom, 1989,
Routledge- London and New York, ISBN 0 415 04404 9, there is an session
you might find useful, on the topic of Shakespeare as a TV writer. "Does
Shakespeare write better for television?".

Nora Kreimer

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[4]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Peggy O'Brien <
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Date:           Tuesday, 29 Sep 1998 22:11:44 -0500
Subject:        Re: Q: Citation for "Shakespeare as television writer?"

> Here's why I'm in need: in my third chapter I talk about the old cliche
> that if Shakespeare were working today he'd be a television writer-that
> is, he'd be working in the ultimate mass medium.  Does anybody know
> where this cliche comes from?  Where I can find a reference to it in
> print?  Have any of y'all written it down in an essay that has then been
> published?

"Old cliche?"  Damn!  Who in their right mind is exactly going to rush
to the aid of someone who has just labeled something they've written an
"old cliche?"  But never mind-the world is a wonderful place.  I'm not
sure that I have ever written it, but I have said it more than dozens of
times to all kinds of audiences, especially student audiences.  I
believe this-and quite apart from any of the context that you mention,
Brad.  My thoughts have to do with storytelling and the sexiest, most
dynamic way to tell stories and receive them.  Having gone from a good
long time exclusively in the world of Shakespeare at the Folger Library
to a now semi-long time at the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, I
believe that old cliche now more than ever.

Agedly yours,
Peggy O'Brien
 

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