1998

Re: Titus: The Movie

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0904  Sunday, 27 September 1998.

[1]     From:   Roy Flannagan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 25 Sep 1998 17:02:31 -0400
        Subj:   Titus in Rome

[2]     From:   Christine Mack Gordon <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 25 Sep 1998 16:08:04 CST6CDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0897  Titus

[3]     From:   Tanya Gough <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 25 Sep 1998 18:15:52 -0400
        Subj:   Titus

[4]     From:   William Kemp <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Saturday, 26 Sep 1998 12:47:23 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0897  Re: Titus in Rome


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Roy Flannagan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 25 Sep 1998 17:02:31 -0400
Subject:        Titus in Rome

Yes, indeed, <italic>Titus Andronicus</italic> is being filmed, or
perhaps is being filmed in Italy, directed by Julie Taymor of
<italic>Lion King</italic> costuming and staging fame, who sees the play
as Shakespeare's <italic>Pulp Fiction.</italic>  Anthony Hopkins is
slated to play Titus, and Jessica Lange, Kristin Scott Thomas, and John
Tinturro were rumored to be interested in the production, or some of
them are in it already.  The last rumor circulating on the Web is that
it is now shooting in Rome.

And, while we are on the subject, what is the current critical take on
the play?  The 1985 BBC videotaped production works very well with this
generation of students.  It does not play up the violence, but when the
bloody stumps and chicken bones finally appear, stomachs are upset even
in the <italic>Scream II</italic> generation.

The play, however, was recently dismissed in a book-length study of
Shakespeare's Roman plays as not really historical and therefore not
really Roman.  Is the play more mythical or fairy-tale-ish than Roman?
Or is it just Senecan rather than historical?  Or is it true to the
spirit of Shakespeare's other Roman plays?

Does anyone know Julie Taymor's Roman e-mail address?  Perhaps the list
could give her a few tips?

Roy Flannagan

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Christine Mack Gordon <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 25 Sep 1998 16:08:04 CST6CDT
Subject: 9.0897  Titus
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0897  Titus

Karen Coley asked about a film of _Titus Andronicus_: the film will be
directed by Julie Taymor (of Broadway's _The Lion King_, among other
significant theatrical productions; the latest issue of _American
Theatre_ has a profile of her) and star Antony Hopkins; according to the
Internet Movie Data Base, it's in pre-production, ready to start filming
for three months in Rome. The current working title is _Titus_.

Chris Gordon

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tanya Gough <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 25 Sep 1998 18:15:52 -0400
Subject:        Titus

For Karen Colley, who asked about the film Titus:  the film is in
production, and Anthony Hopkins has been confirmed, at least according
to the Internet Movie Database.  As for Tom McCamus' participation, I
believe you are correct, although he will be unavailable for shooting
until the Stratford Festival ends in mid-November.  I'll ask him about
it next time he comes in my shop and see if I can't cajole some more
info from him.

Tanya Gough

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           William Kemp <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 26 Sep 1998 12:47:23 -0400
Subject: 9.0897  Re: Titus in Rome
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0897  Re: Titus in Rome

Karen Coley asks for confirmation of a new film of Titus with Anthony
Hopkins.

The IMDb list the film as in preproduction, scheduled (as of 14
September) to start shooting in Rome in three months. The director
listed is Julie Taymor. No information about the production company (and
no source cited for the information given).

Go to http://us.imdb.com/Details?Titus+(1999)

Bill Kemp
Mary Washington College
Fredericksburg, Va.

Re: Hamnet; Tempest Doubling

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0903  Sunday, 27 September 1998.

[1]     From:   Justin Bacon <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 17 Sep 1998 07:14:10 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0838  Re: Hamnet

[2]     From:   Alan Dessen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Saturday, 26 Sep 1998 09:32:17 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0900  Re: Tempest Doubling


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Justin Bacon <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 17 Sep 1998 07:14:10 -0700
Subject: 9.0838  Re: Hamnet
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0838  Re: Hamnet

> One can understand a joking self-reference,  but would Shakespeare have
> wanted to make a semi-private reference about Hamnet,  considering his
> short life?

I am, of course, an author of nowhere near Shakespeare's
quality-however, I have often used veiled references in my work in order
to work through and cope with tragedy in my own life. I would find it
completely believable that Shakespeare may have done the same.

Justin Bacon
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Alan Dessen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 26 Sep 1998 09:32:17 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 9.0900  Re: Tempest Doubling
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0900  Re: Tempest Doubling

Since 1987 ACTER has toured the U.S. with four five-actor productions of
*The Tempest*, all with the same casting breakdown.  The current Fall
1998 version has John Kane as Prospero-Antonio-Ceres-Master, Paul
Greenwood as Caliban-Gonzalo-Iris, Mairead Carty as
Miranda-Ariel-Adrian-Francisco, Patrick Miller as
Ferdinand-Sebastian-Trinculo, and Stephen Simms as
Stephano-Alonso-Juno-Boatswain.  The group has just finished a week at
U.  of Memphis and will be doing residencies at Roanoke College, Ohio
State U., Lawrence U., U. of Texas-San Antonio, Pomona College,
Wellesley, and U. of North Carolina-Chapel Hill.  As might be
anticipated, the doubling and tripling is most daunting in the final
ensemble scene, but one of the high points of this show is the switching
near the end of 5.1 between Trinculo-Stephano-Prospero and
Sebastian-Alonso-Antonio.

Alan Dessen, Director of ACTER

New Electronic Journal: *SRASP*

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0901  Friday, 25 September 1998.

From:           Ed Taft <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 25 Sep 1998 11:32:15 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        New Electronic Journal: *SRASP*

SHAKSPERians may be interested to know of a new electronic journal
devoted to Shakespeare and Renaissance literature and culture: *SRASP*
-- Shakespeare and Renaissance Association [of West Virginia]: Selected
Papers. This annual journal publishes the best papers from the yearly
West Virginia Shakespeare and Renaissance Conference, a national
conference that draws participants from all over the United States and
Canada. The journal has been published in paper form since 1976 and is
indexed in *MLA* and *The World Shakespeare Bibliography,* and both the
journal and its editor are members of CELJ, the Council of Editors of
Learned Journals:

                            EDITOR
                        Byron Nelson
                    West Virginia University

                        EDITORIAL BOARD
                Sharon Beehler, Montana State U.
                H.R. Coursen, Editor, *Shakespeare and the Classroom
                W.L. Godshalk, U of Cincinnati
                Albert C. Labriola, Duquesne U
                Harrison T. Meserole, Texas A&M U
                Phyllis R. Rackin, U of Pennsylvania
                John Rooks, Morris College
                John T. Shawcross, U of Kentucky
                Edmund M. Taft, Marshall U

Volumes 20 (1997) and 21 (1998) can now be accessed through the WWW:
http://www.marshall.edu/engsr/indexsr.htmlx. The online editor is Edmund
M. Taft: <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>. Below are the contents of Volume 20 and
Volume 21:

                        Volume 20

Approximations: Iago as Plautine *leno*
        --K.J. Gilchrist (Iowa State)
The Lute as Mediator in the English Renaissance
        --Brian Holloway (The College of West Virginia)
Election, "Dialogue-Wise," in *The Pilgrims Progress*
        --R. J. McCutcheon (Davis and Elkins College)
"Swift hart" and "soft heart": Elizabeth I and the Iconography of Lyly's
*Gallathea* and Shakespeare's *A Midsummer Night's Dream*
        --Julia A. Bowen (Duquesne U)
A Text of Shreds and Patches: Shakespeare and Popular Culture
        --Annalisa Castaldo (Temple U)

Plus, reviews of current books by H.R. Coursen, Byron Nelson, Rudolph P.
Almasy, and William French.

                        Volume 21

Poetical Historiography: Milton's *History of Britain*
        --James Egan (U of Akron)
Vincentio's Fraud: Boundary and Chaos, Abstinence and Orgy in *Measure
for Measure"
        --Brian Holloway (The College of West Virginia)
The Sanctification of the Tudor Dynasty in Bernard Andre's *Vita
Regis Henrici Septimi*
        --Daniel Hobbins (U of Notre Dame)
Commodification and Representation: The Body in Shakespeare's History
Plays
        --K.A. Ewert (Shakespeare Institute)
How "Unpopular" were Philip and the Spanish in the Popular
Opinion of Mary's Day?
        --James H. Forse (Bowling Green State U)
Shakespeare's *Edward III*
        --W.L. Godshalk (U of Cincinnati)

Plus, reviews of current books by Byron Nelson and William French.

As online editor, I hope that many SHAKSPERians will have occasion to
access this new electronic version of *SRASP*. In the past few years,
the journal has published essays by W.L. Godshalk, H.R. Coursen, James
Egan, Michael D. Friedman, James Forse, and other Renaissance scholars
of note. Again, the journal is easily accessed:
http://www.marshall.edu/engsr/indexsr.htmlx

Thanks for your time.

Edmund M. Taft, Online Editor
*SRASP*

Re: Globe Merchant

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0902  Sunday, 27 September 1998.

[1]     From:   Justin Bacon <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 17 Sep 1998 07:07:42 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0820  Re: Globe Merchant

[2]     From:   Justin Bacon <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 17 Sep 1998 07:17:07 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0837  Re: Globe Merchant


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Justin Bacon <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 17 Sep 1998 07:07:42 -0700
Subject: 9.0820  Re: Globe Merchant
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0820  Re: Globe Merchant

> Exactly. For several years the Globe's has had spokespersons telling
> people to come and cheer or hiss during the performance. The binary
> responses to H5 were bad enough, but in MV this treatment clearly rides
> roughshod over the subtlety of the thing.

I would, personally, have no problem if the groundling audiences
naturally assumed the role they have assumed over the past two
seasons-but the fact that they are literally pushed into it depresses
me. Could not Rylance and crew have allowed their audience to find their
*own* voice in the relative freedom of the Globe instead of encouraging
this half-cocked, second-rate roleplaying?

Elizabethan audiences behaved like themselves. They were not coached.

Justin Bacon
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Justin Bacon <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 17 Sep 1998 07:17:07 -0700
Subject: 9.0837  Re: Globe Merchant
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0837  Re: Globe Merchant

> Portraying Shylock as a "stage Jew" is like saying Shakespeare is just
> another playwright. The people who come off as monsters in the play are
> the Christians, those kind, generous people who spit on other people,
> and encourage daughters to disobey their fathers. Sure, boo Shylock, if
> you can do it without feeling queasy, if you can do it without seeing
> yourself as one of the people doing the spitting.

A slight point of order: Remember that Shakespeare felt that daughters
disobeying fathers in the name of love was a *good* thing. (Hermia in
MND, Cordelia in Lear, Desdemona in Othello, and even Ophelia in
Hamlet.)

Of course the way it is done in MoV is reprehensible. Like so many other
things in Shakespeare, this possesses a double edge.

Justin Bacon
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Re: Tempest Doubling

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0900  Friday, 25 September 1998.

[1]     From:   Susann Suprenant <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 24 Sep 1998 09:39:54 -0700
        Subj:   Re: Tempest Doubling

[2]     From:   David Lindley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 24 Sep 1998 17:48:48 GMT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0890  Tempest Doubling


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Susann Suprenant <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 24 Sep 1998 09:39:54 -0700
Subject:        Re: Tempest Doubling

Jimmy Jung brought up an instance of doubling Ariel/Miranda and asked
about a comparable doubling with Caliban.  I haven't seen it done, but
doubling Caliban/Ferdinand could work to emphasize a sort of Beauty and
the Beast reading of Caliban and Ferdinand (Beast/Prince).  They are
naturally compared since Miranda has never seen any other man other than
her father.  Caliban and Ferdinand both are sensitive to the music of
the isle, are accused of trying to usurp Prospero's control of the
island, and recognize Miranda's beauty.  They both encounter Prospero's
hostility in protection of Miranda-the possible violation of her
"honor"/"virgin knot" is one of Prospero's chief concerns.  Caliban and
Ferdinand are both imprisoned and fed a similar diet, given the task to
carry logs and the test of remaining chaste in the same "cell" with
Miranda.  Ferdinand's entrances are often immediately after a similar
scene with Caliban.  An actor playing the two roles could manage if
Ferdinand and Miranda exit (V. i.) after their union is blessed by
Alonso.  Has anyone seen a performance with this doubling?

Take care,
Susann

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Lindley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 24 Sep 1998 17:48:48 GMT
Subject: 9.0890  Tempest Doubling
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0890  Tempest Doubling

In the Shared Experience Tempest (1997) Antonio doubled the part of
Trinculo,  Sebastian Stephano (and Caliban was also the Boatswain).
This made some sense, in terms of doubling two versions of conspiracy.
The motives may have been economic, but the doubling made dramatic
sense, and actually required remarkably little adaptation of the final
scene.  The Compass Theatre Company (1998) attempted a performance with
6 actors, in which Miranda doubled Antonio, Caliban Alonso, Gonzalo
Trinculo, and one actor played Sebastian, Stephano and Ferdinand.   The
director began his programme note: 'It would be dishonest to claim that
economics played no part in our decision to double up parts in the
Tempest.  However, virtue can be made of necessity, and in this instance
the doubling of roles illuminates the heart of the production.'  He
argued, for example, that the play was about 'the acceptance of the base
or gross' within all of us - hence the doubling of 'the innocence of
Mranda with the evil of Antonio', etc.  It meant, however, that the
final act became, of necessity, a farce, as actors rushed from one side
of the stage to the other to assume their different roles.   (The
director saw this as the 'celebration of both the play and the theatre'
- I wasn't convinced).

David Lindley
School of English
University of Leeds

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