1998

"Titus!"

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0842  Tuesday, 15 September 1998.

From:           Martin Jukovsky <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 14 Sep 1998 11:58:20 -0400
Subject:        "Titus!"

The following appeared on the Stephen Sondheim mailing list--

Attention Bay Area musical comedy fans:

John Fisher, creator of the legendary shows "Medea: The Musical" and
"The Joy of Gay Sex", was given a grant to stage a Shakespeare play here
in San Francisco, and the fruits of his efforts, "Titus!", is now
playing at the Yerba Buena Gardens across from SFMoMA for the next
couple of weekends.  It's an environmental, singing and dismembering
rendition of the Bard's bloodiest play, "Titus Andronicus", and it's a
lot of fun.  Bring some red wine and a good pair of walking shows and
enjoy (oh, and it's free!)

Martin Jukovsky
Cambridge, Mass.
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Web site:  http://www.channel1.com/users/martyj/

CFP: Shakespeare in the New Millennium

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0841  Monday, 14 September 1998.

From:           Susan C Oldrieve <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 12 Sep 1998 12:37:53 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Call for Papers

CALL FOR PAPERS
Shakespeare in the New Millennium

The Ohio Shakespeare Conference
Cleveland, Ohio
March 18, 19, 20, 1999
Sponsored this year by Baldwin-Wallace College

Plenary addresses by Michael Bristol (author of Carnival and Theater and
Big Time Shakespeare),  James Bundy (artistic director, Great Lakes
Theater Festival), and Michael Mullin (Cybershakespeare project)

Topics will include pedagogy, performance, technology, the future of
Shakespeare studies, theory, and diversity issues.   Both experienced
and new scholars are encouraged to submit either abstracts or completed
essays.

We are also issuing a special invitation to UNDERGRADUATES to submit
papers for two undergraduate sessions.  Undergraduate papers may address
any of the topics listed above or examine one of Shakespeare's works
from the perspective of future audiences.  All undergraduate submissions
must be completed essays and must be accompanied by a letter of
recommendation from a supervising instructor.

All submissions must be received by January 5, 1999.

Send submissions and requests for registration information to

                        Professor Susan Oldrieve
                        Department of English
                        Baldwin-Wallace College
                        Berea, Ohio  44017
                        Phone:  440-826-2291
                        Fax:    440-892-1994
                        Email:  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

CUNY Renaissance Studies Fall Schedule

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0839  Monday, 14 September 1998.

From:           Martin Elsky <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 11 Sep 1998 09:29:33 -0400
Subject:        CUNY Renaissance Studies Fall Schedule

[With apologies for cross-posting]

Graduate School and University Center
City University of New York
33 W 42 Street
New York, NY 10036

          CUNY RENAISSANCE STUDIES CERTIFICATE PROGRAM

            **************************************
            *                                    *
            * http://web.gc.cuny.edu/dept/renai/ *
            *                                    *
            **************************************

SCHEDULE OF CUNY RENAISSANCE AND EARLY MODERN EVENTS

Admission is free and open to the public


FALL 1998

For information, please contact Professor Martin Elsky, Coordinator,
Renaissance Studies Program, Room 40-09, Grace Building
(Phone:212-642-2346; Fax: 212-642-2205; email:
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.).

Thursday, September 24
Beatrice Gottlieb, "Women in a Service Society." 7:00-9:00pm; Room 202
Graduate School. (Sponsored by Society for the Study of Women in the
Renaissance; for further information contact Betty Travitsky, email:
BTRAVITSKY/This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)

Saturday, October 10
Columbia University Conference, co-sponsored by CUNY Renaissance Studies
Program: "WORKING CAPITAL: EARLY MODERN TEXTS AND CRITICAL DEBATES."
Event to take place at Columbia University. For further information, see
http://www.columbia.edu/cu/english/capital.html

Tuesday, October 27
Daniel Javitch (Comparative Literature, New York University), "Thinking
about Genre in the Sixteenth Century." 6:30-8:30pm; Room 40-18 Grace
Building. (Sponsored by The Graduate Colloquium in Comparative
Literature and Italian Studies)

Thursday, October 29
Anne Lake Prescott (English, Barnard College), "'And then she fell in a
great laughter': Marguerite de Navarre and English Diplomats."
7:00-9:00pm; Room 202 Graduate School. (Sponsored by SSWR)

Friday, November 13
CUNY Renaissance Studies Colloquium Series SCATTERED BODIES OF TRUTH:
INTER-RELIGIOUS/SECTARIAN RELATIONS, 1450-1700 Regina Schwartz (English,
Northwestern University), "Milton and Reformation Poetics"; Ronnie
Po-Chia Hsia (History, New York University), "Reuchlin and Jewish
Conversion"; Respondent: Richard McCoy (English, CUNY Graduate School
and Queens College); 4:00-6:00pm, 3rd-Floor Studio, Graduate School.
Reception to follow. (Co-sponsored by Ph.D. Programs in English and
History; NYU Seminar in the Renaissance).  Abstracts to be posted at a
later date.

Thursday, November 19
Barbara Bowen (English, GSUC/Queens College), "Aemilia Lanyer and the
Scene of Reading." 7:00-9:00pm; Room TBA (Sponsored by SSWR)

Tuesday, November 24
Bette Talvacchia (University of Connecticut), "Sexual Representation and
the Issue of _I Modi_ in the Sixteenth Century." 6:30-8:30pm; Room 40-18
Grace Building. (Sponsored by The Graduate Colloquium in Comparative
Literature and Italian Studies)

December
Date TBA
Renaissance Studies Teleconference: Lisa Jardine and Warren Boutcher
(English, Queen Mary and Westfiled College, University of London), "The
Pre-War and Post-War Context of Twentieth-Century Scholarship of
Renaissance Humanism." Seating Limited.

Tuesday, December 1
Susan Zimmerman (English, Queens College), "Duncan's Corpse: Discourses
of the Dead in _Macbeth_." 6:30-8:30pm; Room 40-18 Grace Building.
(Sponsored by The Graduate Colloquium in Comparative Literature and
Italian Studies)

Thursday, January 28
Nathan Tinker (English, Fordham University), "Print and Manuscript in
the 1650's: The Case of Katherine Philips." 7:00-9:00pm; Room 202
Graduate School. (Sponsored by SSWR)

TENTATIVE SCHEDULE FOR SPRING 1999

February
SCATTERED BODIES OF TRUTH II
Program on the Edict of Nantes

March
SCATTERED BODIES OF TRUTH III
Program on the New World and the Ottoman Empire

April
Annual Shakespeare Birthday Lecture

Re: Kurosawa; Used Books; Things British

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0840  Monday, 14 September 1998.

[1]     From:   Hugh H. Davis <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 11 Sep 1998 08:45:06 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0832  Re: Kurosawa

[2]     From:   Laura Fargas <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Saturday, 12 Sep 1998 13:03:47 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0827  Re: Used Books

[3]     From:   Judy Lewis <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Sunday, 13 Sep 1998 17:27:17 +1200
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0829  Re: Things British


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Hugh H. Davis <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 11 Sep 1998 08:45:06 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 9.0832  Re: Kurosawa
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0832  Re: Kurosawa

Tom Sullivan wrote:
> I only regret that we will never see a film of _Hamlet_ by [Kurosawa].

Actually, Kurosawa's 1961 film _The Bad Sleep Well_ is a variation on
Hamlet, set in modern day Japan.  None of AK's modern films have carried
the same weight or reputation as his samurai and historical pictures, so
it hasn't made it to the US recently, but everything I've read about it
suggests it is a well-made film with careful choices by "the Emperor".

Hugh Davis

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Laura Fargas <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 12 Sep 1998 13:03:47 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 9.0827  Re: Used Books
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0827  Re: Used Books

Christopher Warley wrote:

> To Curtis Perry's advice to Amy Ulen, I'd add bibliofind.com and
> powells.com, both truly amazing online used book sources.

There's a bookfinder metasearch now , www.mxbf.com, which searches
Amazon, Powell's, Bibliocity, the European Antiqbooks, and Advanced Book
Exchange.  It doesn't, however, include bibliofind.com.

Laura Fargas

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Judy Lewis <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 13 Sep 1998 17:27:17 +1200
Subject: 9.0829  Re: Things British
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0829  Re: Things British

An addition to the info given on the titles of Prince of Wales.

The title was first conferred on the eldest son of the monarch by Edward
I.  He had destroyed the Welsh nationalist cause by defeating the last
true Prince of Wales Daffydd ap Gryffedd, younger brother of the great
Llewellyn (who married, interestingly, the daughter of Simon de
Montfort, architect of the Magna Carta, and also defeated by Edward).
Edward made it part of his policy as king to destroy Welsh independence
and bring Wales under the rule of the English.  He tried to do the same
with Scotland but was thwarted by the Robert the Bruce and William
Wallace (though the truth of that bears little resemblance to the recent
Mel Gibson movie.)

Anyway, back to Wales.  Edward is said to have promised the Welsh as
part of the deal that he would give them a prince who was born in Wales
and spoke no English.  His son was born in Caernarvon Castle, and of
course, couldn't talk at all when Edward presented the baby to the Welsh
as their Welsh-born Prince of Wales.  The tradition of the title has
continued ever since.  This baby went on to become Edward II, marrying a
French princess who never met William Wallace/Mel Gibson since the
marriage took place in 1308, three years after Wallace's death, and the
first baby she bore was born in 1312 - which would be the longest
pregnancy in history if Wallace was the father.

The only child of George IV, Charlotte, was known as the Princess of
Wales, but whether this was as heir presumptive or because her father
was Prince of Wales (and Prince Regent) I don't know.  She never became
queen, because she died in child birth in 1817; her father succeeded to
the throne in 1820, having been Regent for a number of years (see The
Madness of King George), and on his death in 1830, he was succeeded by
his next brother William IV, who had no legitimate children.  On his
death in 1837, the 18 year old Victoria became Queen.

Re: Hamnet

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0838  Monday, 14 September 1998.

[1]     From:   Simon Malloch <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 11 Sep 1998 22:42:18 +0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0833 Re: Hamnet

[2]     From:   David J. Kathman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 11 Sep 1998 22:20:18 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0833  Re: Hamnet

[3]     From:   W. L. Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Saturday, 12 Sep 1998 17:09:28 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0833  Re: Hamnet


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Simon Malloch <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 11 Sep 1998 22:42:18 +0800
Subject: 9.0833 Re: Hamnet
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0833 Re: Hamnet

Christopher Nicholson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.> wrote:

> Forgive my ignorance but whose was Hamnet?  I'm familiar with Amleth and
> the stories around his death, indeed the name Corambus is derived from
> this story (featured in the 1st "Bad" Quarto as Corambus/Polonius) but
> I'm afraid my knowledge of Danish History is a little vague...
>
> Would you be so good as to enlighten me?

Hamnet was Shakespeare's son, christened with his twin, Judith, on the
2nd of February,  1585. Schoenbaum notes that he was "evidently" named
after Hamnet Sadler,  a young baker of Stratford,  who was close to the
family.  Hamnet was buried on the 11th of August,  1596.

Tad Davis asks:

> If (as Jonathan Bate suggests in his recent book "Shakespeare's Genius") the
> boy William in "Merry Wives" is a joking self-reference, why couldn't Hamlet
> likewise be a kind of semi-private self-reference?

One can understand a joking self-reference,  but would Shakespeare have
wanted to make a semi-private reference about Hamnet,  considering his
short life?

Simon Malloch.

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David J. Kathman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 11 Sep 1998 22:20:18 +0100
Subject: 9.0833  Re: Hamnet
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0833  Re: Hamnet

Tad Davis wrote:

>Cindy Sullivan asked about Hamnet Shakespeare and "Hamlet". Many writers
>have suggested that Hamnet and Judith Shakespeare were named after
>neighbors Hamnet and Judith Sadler, and Hamnet Sadler's name appears at
>one point in Shakespeare's will as "Hamlett": so there could be a
>connection on some level. Anthony Burgess once suggested the names were
>interchangeable, using the analogy "chimney/chimbley."

In fact, Sadler's name was rendered as "Hamlet" in contemporary
documents almost as often as it was "Hamnet".  Marc Eccles' *Shakespeare
in Warwickshire*, p.126, mentions several documents besides
Shakespeare's will where he is called "Hamlet(t)": the 1595 return of
maltsters, a 1597 letter from Abraham Sturley ("I would Hamlet weare at
home"), the 1601 will of Sadler's brother-in-law John Smith, and the
1606 will of his cousin Helen Sadler.  The regularization to "Hamnet" is
a function of modern editors, much like the modern regularization of
"Marley", "Marlin", "Morley", and "Marlo" to "Marlowe".

Dave Kathman
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W. L. Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 12 Sep 1998 17:09:28 -0400
Subject: 9.0833  Re: Hamnet
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0833  Re: Hamnet

Lee Zhao writes:

>I don't know about that, but if you're thinking along the line of the
>similarities in name Hamnet and Hamlet, then you'd probably be wrong.
>Hamlet comes from a Danish legend and the main character in the legend
>goes by the name of Amleth.

But is it possible that Shakespeare would have dropped the H in Hamlet
and pronounced the th as t?  In other words, would Shakespeare have
pronounced Hamlet and Amleth as Amlet? For example, aren't the names
Otto and Otho pronounced the same way, i.e., Ot-ho?

I remember reading many years ago the claim that Hamnet was a diminutive
of Hamlet, but I have no evidence to corroborate that claim.

Yours, Bill Godshalk

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