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Home :: Archive :: 1998 :: August ::
Re: Shakespeare's Pronunciation
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0710  Saturday, 1 August 1998.

[1]     From:   Harry Hill <
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        Date:   Thursday, 30 Jul 1998 13:22:20 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0708 Re: Shakespeare's Pronunciation

[2]     From:   Bernice W. Kliman <
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        Date:   Thursday, 30 Jul 1998 13:26:19 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0708  Re: Shakespeare's Pronunciation

[3]     From:   Thomas L. Berger  <
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        Date:   Thursday, 30 Jul 1998 15:35:03 EDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 9.0708 Re: Shakespeare's Pronunciation


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Harry Hill <
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Date:           Thursday, 30 Jul 1998 13:22:20 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 9.0708 Re: Shakespeare's Pronunciation
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0708 Re: Shakespeare's Pronunciation

Jonathan Hope is helpful in placing Barber over Kokeritz. I was brought
up on Helge Kokeritz's 10" LP of "Shakespeare's Pronunciation" [spelled
differently, of course] and recall laughing at his thoroughly Dansk
reading of "To be or not to be" with its heavily inverted R's and
Swedish Chef melodic line. The tongue inversion on the R was almost
doubtless strong, as it survived a bit even in Tennyson's reading of The
Charge Of The Light Brigade to which I sometimes painfully listen, and
persists in Warwickshire, Devon and other places still. As John Barton
found, preserving the inversion renders many verbal concepts the more
edible and tangible than Olivier et al's RP silence on the R in spots
where it isn't rolled.

        Harry Hill

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Bernice W. Kliman <
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 >
Date:           Thursday, 30 Jul 1998 13:26:19 -0400
Subject: 9.0708  Re: Shakespeare's Pronunciation
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0708  Re: Shakespeare's Pronunciation

Has anyone seen Dale F. Coye's *Pronouncing Shakespeare's Words: A Guide
from A to Zounds*? Greenwood, 1998. It's based, according to a review I
read, on interviews with scholars, and is organized by plays and poems.
744 pg. This may be a good book for non-specialists, professors and
students alike.

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Thomas L. Berger  <
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Date:           Thursday, 30 Jul 1998 15:35:03 EDT
Subject: 9.0708 Re: Shakespeare's Pronunciation
Comment:        Re: SHK 9.0708 Re: Shakespeare's Pronunciation

More for the general reader, non-linguist type may be Dale Coye's
PRONOUNCING SHAKESPEARE'S WORDS, new from Greenwood Press (1998, 724
pp.)

Tom Berger
 

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